Sir William Tomlinson, 1st Baronet

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Tomlinson in 1895.

Sir William Edward Murray Tomlinson, 1st Baronet (4 August 1838 – 17 December 1912) was an English lawyer, colliery owner and Conservative politician.

Tomlinson was born in the Lancaster registration district in Lancashire and became a barrister.[1] He was living at 3 Richmond Terrace Richmond from 1868 until his death.[2] He was part owner of the Worsley Mesnes Colliery Company.[3]

Tomlinson was elected as Member of Parliament for Preston in 1882, and held the seat until 1906. In the 1900 election he was challenged unsuccessfully by Keir Hardie. It was announced that he would receive a baronetcy in the 1902 Coronation Honours list published on 26 June 1902 for the (subsequently postponed) coronation of King Edward VII,[4] and on 24 July 1902 he was created a Baronet, of Richmond terrace, Whitehall, in the city of Westminster, in the county of London.[5] At the end of March, 1903, Tomlinson was appointed a deputy lieutenant of Lancashire.[6]

Winston Churchill was challenged to fisticuffs when he referred to Tomlinson as "a miserable old man".[7]

Tomlinson never married and on his death at the age of 74 the baronetcy became extinct. .

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Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
William Farrer Ecroyd
Henry Cecil Raikes
Member of Parliament for Preston
1882–1906
With: William Farrer Ecroyd 1882–1885
Robert William Hanbury 1885–1903
John Kerr 1903–1906
Succeeded by
John Thomas Macpherson
Harold Cox
Baronetage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baronet
(of Richmond Terrace)
1902–1912
Extinct