Skryabin (band)

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Skryabin
Скрябін.jpg
Background information
Origin Novoyavorivsk, Ukraine
Genres Alternative rock, new wave, synthpop
Years active 1989-present
Associated acts Yulia Lord, Iryna Bilyk, Druha Rika, Dazzle Dreams

Skryabin (Ukrainian: Скрябін, also transliterated as Scriabin or Skriabin) is a famous Ukrainian rock, pop band formed in 1989 in Novoyarivsk, Ukraine. Prominent Ukrainian musician Andriy "Kuzma" Kuzmenko (Ukrainian: Андрій Кузьменко) was the band's lead singer until his death in 2015.[1]

During its existence Skryabin has gone from synthpop to rock and pop music. As it progressed the band has been divided into "the classic Skryabin" and "the new Skryabin". The border between these two runs between 2000-2003.

One of the group's 2005 songs, Lyudy Yak Korabli (Ukrainian: Люди Як Кораблі), spent a record 39 continuous weeks (as of the end of 2007) on FDR Radiocenter's Top 40, which began tracking Ukrainian radioplay in May 2002. In February 2006 Stari Fotohrafiyi (Ukrainian: Старі Фотографії) debuted at #1 on the chart and Padai (Ukrainian: Падай) similarly entered in the top slot three months later.[2]

The group was named "Best Pop Band" in 2006 at the "ShowBiz Awards” held in Kyiv's National Opera House.[3]


Discography[edit]

This list contains only full albums excluding singles, compilations, remixes, lives and other projects.

  • 1989 — Чуєш біль (Feel The Pain)
  • 1992 — Мова риб (Fishes Language)
  • 1993 — Технофайт (Technofight)
  • 1995 — Птахи (Birds)
  • 1997 — Мова риб (Fishes Language, re-release)
  • 1997 — Казки (Fairytales)
  • 1999 — Хробак (Worm)
  • 1999 — Еутерпа (Euterpa)
  • 1999 — Технофайт 1999 (Technofight 1999)
  • 2000 — Модна країна (Fashionable Country)
  • 2001 — Стриптиз (Striptease)
  • 2002 — Озимі люди (Winter People)
  • 2003 — Натура (Nature)
  • 2005 — Танго (Tango)
  • 2006 — Гламур (Glamour)
  • 2007 — Про любов? (About Love?)
  • 2009 — Моя еволюція (My Evolution)
  • 2012 — Радіо Любов (Radio Love)
  • 2013 — Добряк (Kind Soul)
  • 2014 — 25

References[edit]

External links[edit]