Smart Women

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Smart Women
Smart Women book cover.jpg
First edition
Author Judy Blume
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Putnam
Publication date
1983
Media type Print (Paperback)
Pages 288 pp
ISBN 0-399-12840-9
OCLC 9783725
813/.54 19
LC Class PS3552.L843 S6 1983

Smart Women is a 1983 novel by Judy Blume that tells the story of a divorcee who falls for her friend's ex-husband.

Plot summary[edit]

The story follows Margo and B.B., two divorcees who are trying to restart their lives in Colorado, to the annoyance and amusement of their teenage daughters. Matters get much more complex and relationships strained when B.B.'s ex-husband moves next door to Margo and starts a relationship with her. While the story takes place in the early 80's, almost every reader will be able to relate to Smart Women.

Characters[edit]

  • Margo Sampson - The main character and protagonist in the story. She is an architect.
  • Francine Brady Broder (B.B.) - The antagonist in the story. She is a realtor.
  • Andrew Broder - B.B.'s ex husband and Margo's potential love interest.
  • Stuart Sampson- Margo's son. He is a high school senior.
  • Sara Broder - B.B.'s daughter. She turns 13-years-old in the story.
  • Michelle Sampson - Margo's daughter. She is 17-years-old. Her character is vulnerable which makes her easy to love and understand. She gives her mother a very hard time because she cares about her and just wants her to be happy. She does not want any more disruptions in their lives.

Themes[edit]

The common theme in Smart Women is about divorce, change, love and a new start.

Symbols[edit]

The children represent Judy Blume's sensitivity toward their feelings. Both Sara and Michelle are mentioned throughout the whole book. She makes it clear they come first when it comes to Margo's and B.B's decision making. Both daughters provide the humor and poignancy in the story. [1]

External links[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blume 1983, p. 9-10.