Sonia Sekula

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Sonia Sekula (18 April 1918 – 25 April 1963) (also known as Sonja Sekula) was a Swiss-born artist linked with the abstract expressionist movement, notable for her activity as an "out" lesbian in the New York art world during the 1940s and early 1950s.[1]

She was born in Lucerne on 8 April 1918 to a Swiss mother, Berta Huguenin (1896–1980), and a Hungarian father, Béla Sekula (1881–1966), a philatelist.

She lived in America from 1936 to 1955. She attended Sarah Lawrence College. She met the surrealists in exile in New York during 1942.[2] On 25 April 1963 she hanged herself in her studio in Zurich after many years of mental health issues.[3] She is buried in St. Moritz as she had requested in a letter to her mother.[4]

Exhibitions[edit]

  • 1943 - Group show 31 Women Artists, Art of this Century Gallery, New York
  • 1948 - Betty Parsons Gallery, New York
  • 1953 - Group Show "Nine Women Painters", Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont
  • 1957 - Galerie Palette, Zurich, Switzerland
  • 1996 - Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Switzerland (1 June - 11 August)
  • 1996 - Sonja Sekula (1918–1963): A Retrospective, Swiss Institute, New York, USA (12 September - 26 October) [5]
  • 2016 - "Sonja Sekula, Max Ernst, Jackson Pollock & Friends", Kunstmuseum Luzern, Switzerland

Bibliography[edit]

  • Womb - poem and drawing - VVV, March 1943
  • Who was Sonia Sekula?, Art in America, October 1971 [6]
  • A Golden Girl Escaping Into Infinity, New York Times, 20 September 1996[7]
  • Sonja Sekula - Im Zeichen der Frage, im Zeichen der Antwort. Ausgewählte Texte und Wortbilder, (in German and English) Lenos Verlag, Zürich 1996. ISBN 3-85787-250-0
  • Dunkelschwestern - Annemarie von Matt und Sonja Sekula, by Roger Perret and Roman Kurzmeyer, 2008
  • "Sekula, Sonja". SIKART dictionary and database. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Mann (2015), glbtqarchive.com
  2. ^ "Sonja Sekula - Time Line". www.sonja-sekula.org. Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  3. ^ http://www.glbtq.com/arts/sekula_s,4.html
  4. ^ "Sonja Sekula - Time Line". www.sonja-sekula.org. Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  5. ^ Glueck, Grace (1996-09-20). "A Golden Girl Escaping Into Infinity". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  6. ^ "Art in America". www.sonja-sekula.org. Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  7. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/1996/09/20/arts/a-golden-girl-escaping-into-infinity.html?pagewanted=1