Spilanthes

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Spilanthes
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
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Genus:
Spilanthes

Type species
Spilanthes urens[2][3]
Synonyms[1]
  • Spilanthus L., alternate spelling
  • Ceruchis Gaertn. ex Schreb.
  • Spilanthes sect. Salivaria DC.
  • Ceratocephalus Kuntze

Spilanthes is a genus of African and South American plants in the sunflower tribe within the daisy family.[4][3][5]

Species[1][6]
  1. Spilanthes anactina F.Muell.
  2. Spilanthes callimorpha A.H.Moore
  3. Spilanthes commutata K.Koch
  4. Spilanthes costata Benth.
  5. Spilanthes intermedia (Rich.) DC.
  6. Spilanthes montana Britton & S.F.Blake
  7. Spilanthes ocymifolia (Lam.) A.H.Moore
  8. Spilanthes ovata Merr.
  9. Spilanthes paraguayensis R.K.Jansen
  10. Spilanthes pauciceps (Griseb.) S.F.Blake
  11. Spilanthes sartorii Sch.Bip. ex Klatt
  12. Spilanthes sessilis Poepp. & Endl.
  13. Spilanthes urens Jacq.
formerly included[1]

Numerous species once included in Spilanthes are now considered better suited in other genera (Acmella Adenostemma Eclipta Heliopsis Isocarpha Jaegeria Melampodium Salmea Verbesina Wollastonia Zinnia). The best known of these is the toothache plant, formerly Spilanthes acmella, now called Acmella oleracea, a Brazilian species widely used as a culinary and medicinal herb.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Flann, C (ed) 2009+ Global Compositae Checklist
  2. ^ lectotype designated by Moore, Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts 42: 552. 1907
  3. ^ a b Tropicos, Spilanthes Jacq.
  4. ^ Jacquin, Nicolaus Joseph von. 1760. Enumeratio Systematica Plantarum, quas in insulis Caribaeis 8, 28 in Latin
  5. ^ Jansen, R. K. 1981. Systematics of Spilanthes (Compositae: Heliantheae). Systematic Botany 6(3): 231–257.
  6. ^ The Plant List search for Spilanthes
  7. ^ Tiwari, KL; SK Jadhav; V. Joshi (November 2011). "An updated review on medicinal herb genus Spilanthes". Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine. 11. 9: 1170–1178. doi:10.3736/jcim20111103. PMID 22088581. Retrieved 29 December 2013.