St. Patrick (provincial electoral district)

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St. Patrick
Ontario electoral district
Toronto Provincial Ridings 1926a.pdf
St. Patrick, in relation to the other Toronto ridings, after the 1926 redistribution.
Defunct provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Ontario
District created 1925
District abolished 1967
First contested 1926
Last contested 1963

St. Patrick was a provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that was established in 1926. It lasted until 1967 when it was merged with St. Andrew to form St. Andrew—St. Patrick.

St. Patrick riding took its name from the former "St. Patrick's ward" of the City of Toronto.

Boundaries[edit]

It was created after a major riding redistribution in 1926. Its boundaries consisted of Spadina Avenue on the west from Toronto Harbour north to the city limits just north of St. Clair Avenue. On the east the boundary followed Simcoe Street north from the harbour to Queen Street West. After a short jog east to University Avenue it followed that street north through Queen's Park Crescent and then continued north on Avenue Road through to the city limits just north of St. Clair Avenue West.[1]

Members of Provincial Parliament[edit]

St. Patrick
Assembly Years Member Party
Created from parts of Toronto Southwest, Toronto Northeast and Toronto Northwest ridings[2]
17th  1926–1929     John Currie Conservative
18th  1929–1934     Edward Joseph Murphy Conservative
19th  1934–1937     Frederick Fraser Hunter[nb 1] Liberal
20th  1937–1943
21st  1943–1945     Kelso Roberts Progressive Conservative
22nd  1945–1948
23rd  1948–1951     Charles Rea Progressive Conservative
24th  1951–1955     Kelso Roberts Progressive Conservative
25th  1955–1959
26th  1959–1963
27th  1963–1967
Sourced from the Ontario Legislative Assembly[3]
Merged with St. Andrew to form St. Andrew—St. Patrick

Election results[edit]

1926 boundaries[edit]

Ontario general election, 1926
Party Candidate Votes[2][4][nb 2] Vote %
    Conservative John A. Currie 5,103 68.9
    Prohibitionist John Wanless 1,834 24.8
    Liberal L.P. Burns 466 6.3
Total 7,403
Ontario general election, 1929
Party Candidate Votes[5] Vote %
    Conservative E.J. Murphy 4,473 66.8
    Liberal John E. Belfry 1,242 18.5
    Independent-Conservative H. Currie 856 12.8
    Labour R.E. Knowles Jr. 128 1.9
Total 6,699

1934 boundaries[edit]

Toronto riding boundaries after 1934 redistribution
Ontario general election, 1934
Party Candidate Votes[6] Vote %
    Liberal Fraser Hunter 5,751 50.2
    Conservative E. J. Murphy 5,713 49.8
Total 11,464
Ontario general election, 1937
Party Candidate Votes[7] Vote %
    Liberal F.F. Hunter 6,162 48.5
    Conservative A.K. Roberts 5,479 43.1
    Co-operative Commonwealth Felix Lazarus 957 7.5
    Independent-Conservative G.M. Saunders 119 0.9
Total 12,717
Ontario general election, 1943
Party Candidate Votes[8] Vote %
    Conservative A. Kelso Roberts 4,543 44.5
    Liberal Fred Hamilton 2,850 27.9
    Co-operative Commonwealth John Osler 2,817 27.6
Total 10,210
Ontario general election, 1945
Party Candidate Votes[9][nb 3] Vote %
    Conservative A. Kelso Roberts 7,243 50.9
    Co-operative Commonwealth John Osler 2,854 19.9
    Liberal J.M. Gould 2,846 19.8
Labor–Progressive Sam Walsh 1,401 9.8
Total 14,344
Ontario general election, 1948
Party Candidate Votes[10] Vote %
    Conservative Charles E. Rea 7,124 44.0
    Co-operative Commonwealth John Osler 5,483 33.9
    Liberal Lionel Conacher 3,589 22.2
Total 16,196
Ontario general election, 1951
Party Candidate Votes[11] Vote %
    Conservative Kelso Roberts 7,308 57.1
    Co-operative Commonwealth William Newcombe 2,972 23.2
    Liberal William A. MacKenzie 2,518 19.7
Total 12,978
Ontario general election, 1955
Party Candidate Votes[12] Vote %
    Conservative Kelso Roberts 5,150 54.6
    Liberal Donald Plaxton 2,409 25.5
    Co-operative Commonwealth Bruce Hewlett 1,543 16.4
Labor–Progressive Ben Shek 335 3.5
Total 9,437
Ontario general election, 1959
Party Candidate Votes[13] Vote %
    Conservative Kelso Roberts 5,265 59.4
    Liberal Lance Evans 2,469 27.9
    Co-operative Commonwealth Bruce Hewlett 1,127 12.7
Total 8,861
Ontario general election, 1963
Party Candidate Votes[14] Vote %
    Conservative Kelso Roberts 4,820 47.7
    Liberal Mark MacGuigan 4,042 40.0
    New Democrat Gerald Solway 1,026 10.2
Communist Rae Murphy 152 1.5
    Social Credit Action James Audy 55 0.5
Total 10,095

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In 1938, the title of Member of the Legislative Assembly was officially changed to Member of Provincial Parliament. Previously, it was unofficially used in the media and in the Legislature.
  2. ^ 68 out of 71 polls reporting.
  3. ^ 179 out of 200 polls reporting.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Map of Toronto showing Provincial election ridings and City Limits". Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1926-11-06. p. 22. 
  2. ^ a b Canadian Press (1926-12-02). "Ontario General Elections and By-elections, 1923-1926". The Globe. Toronto. p. 7. 
  3. ^ For a listing of each MPP's Queen's Park curriculum vitae see below:
    • For John Currie's Legislative Assembly information see "John Allister Currie, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-26. 
    • For Edward Murphy's Legislative Assembly information see "Edward Joseph Murphy, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-26. 
    • For Frederick Hunter's Legislative Assembly information see "Frederick Fraser Hunter, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-26. 
    • For Kelso Roberts's Legislative Assembly information see "Archibald Kelso Roberts, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-26. 
    • For Charles Rea's Legislative Assembly information see "Charles Edward Rea, MPP". Parliamentary History. Toronto: Legislative Assembly of Ontario. 2012. Retrieved 2012-03-26. 
  4. ^ "Sweep by Tories Returns 15 Wets in Toronto Seats". The Toronto Daily Star (Last Extra edition). Toronto. 1926-12-01. p. 1. 
  5. ^ "Vote Cast and Personnel of the New Ontario Legislature". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1929-10-31. p. 43. 
  6. ^ "Detailed Election Results". The Globe. Toronto. 1934-06-21. p. 3. 
  7. ^ "Ontario Voted By Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. 1937-10-07. p. 5. 
  8. ^ Canadian Press (1943-08-05). "Ontario Election Results". The Gazette. Montreal. p. 12. 
  9. ^ Canadian Press (1945-06-05). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 5. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 
  10. ^ Canadian Press (1948-06-08). "How Ontario Electors Voted in all 90 Ridings". The Toronto Daily Star. Toronto. p. 24. 
  11. ^ Canadian Press (1951-11-22). "Complete Ontario Vote". The Montreal Gazette. Montreal. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  12. ^ Canadian Press (1955-06-10). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  13. ^ Canadian Press (1959-06-12). "Complete Results of Ontario Voting by Constituencies". The Ottawa Citizen. Ottawa. p. 26. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 
  14. ^ Canadian Press (1963-09-26). "78 in Tory Blue Wave -- 23 Is All Grits Saved". The Windsor Star. Windsor, Ontario. p. 25. Retrieved 2012-04-24.