Stone (2010 film)

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Stone
Poster of Stone (2010 film).jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byJohn Curran
Produced byHolly Wiersma
David Mimran
Jordan Schur
Written byAngus MacLachlan
StarringRobert De Niro
Edward Norton
Milla Jovovich
Frances Conroy
Music byCliff Eidelman
CinematographyMaryse Alberti
Edited byAlexandre de Franceschi
Production
company
Distributed byOverture Films
Relativity Media
Release date
  • September 10, 2010 (2010-09-10) (TIFF)
  • October 8, 2010 (2010-10-08) (United States)
Running time
105 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$22 million
Box office$9,479,718[1]

Stone is a 2010 U.S. crime thriller film directed by John Curran and starring Robert De Niro, Edward Norton and Milla Jovovich. Most of the filming was done in Washtenaw County, Michigan.[2] It was the final film to be released by Overture Films. The film's score was composed and conducted by Cliff Eidelman.

Plot[edit]

Young mother Madylyn Mabry puts her daughter to bed while her husband Jack watches golf on television. After the child is asleep, she goes downstairs and announces she's leaving. He runs upstairs to the bedroom and holds their daughter out the window, threatening to drop her if Madylyn leaves. Many years later, Jack Mabry and Madylyn return home from church for a quiet afternoon. He watches TV and drinks in an identical pose. Late that night a call wakes them. Jack picks up the phone and hears a woman's voice. Jack reports to work at a prison, where he's a parole officer. He's called into the warden's office and asked to shut the door. His retirement subject is brought up. Jack requests that he keep all of his inmates until he leaves, in order to see them through until review. Jack has a new case in his office, named Gerald Creeson. The inmate insists that he likes to be called Stone. Stone asks Jack if he can help him get out early. Jack then yells at him, letting him know that they talk about what he wants to talk about. He then asks Stone about his wife, Lucetta. Stone asks about Jack's wife. Jack explains that he doesn't discuss his wife. Jack reminds Stone that they're there to talk about him. Jack meets with Stone again.Stone calls Lucetta from prison and catches her watching the kids at recess. We see Stone having another meeting with Jack. Stone tells him he deserves to be free.That night Lucetta leaves a message on Jack and Madylyn's answering machine. She's waiting for Jack outside the prison the next day.Lucetta calls Jack's house again and Jack meets her for lunch. They end up at Lucetta's place. Jack has a few drinks and ends up sleeping with Lucetta.Two guards come and escort Stone to Medical. While he waits for someone to see him he witnesses another inmate being brutally. Jack soon goes to see Lucetta again for sex. Jack tells her noone can know about their relationship. Jack sees Lucetta again.The next day, he tells Stone that he sent the report recommending early release. The next morning, Jack asks the warden for Stone's report. The warden informs him Stone's parole hearing is in an hour and no changes can be made. Jack doesn't stay for the hearing. Stone is informed that he'll be released. Stone informs Jack he knows he slept with Lucetta. Jack gets home and that night he is paranoid that Stone will retaliate. He awakes to find a fire downstairs. We see Madylyn with her daughter and granddaughter, looking through photo albums. Jack is now retired trying to figure out what to do with his life.

Cast[edit]

Enver Gjokaj and Pepper Binkley appear as younger versions of Jack and Madylyn Mabry, respectively. Many Ypsilanti residents appear as extras.[2]

Production[edit]

The film was directed by John Curran,[6] from a screenplay by Angus MacLachlan. Originally written by MacLachlan in 2000 as a play, it has been performed once, in 2003 as a staged reading. In 2005, MacLachlan turned it into a screenplay aiming for a 2010 release.[3] The film was overseen by Mimran Schur Pictures, with the aid of producer Holly Wiersma.[6] Stone is the debut of Mimran Schur Pictures, formed in 2010 by private investor David Mimran and long-time music business executive and former Geffen Records President Jordan Schur.[4] Stone Productions, the film's production company,[2] also aided in the production of the film.

Filming began on May 18, 2009, in Michigan. Prison scenes were filmed at the Southern Michigan Correctional Facility in Blackman Township.[7] The Emmanuel Lutheran Church of Ypsilanti hosted filming for two days. The funeral service and a few outside scenes were filmed at the Church, with locals as extras.[2] Mast Road, in Dexter, was closed for several weeks while the farmhouse scenes were shot at the historic Mast Farm house; and, at the end of the shoot, it was burned down.[citation needed]

Filming was interrupted on June 5, 2009, when an intoxicated woman got past security and accosted Robert De Niro. She was arrested and admitted to a local hospital.[8][9]

Following a screening at the Toronto International Film Festival, Stone premiered in the United States at the Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas on September 24, 2010.[10]

The main theme for the film was composed by musician Jon Brion.

Reception[edit]

Stone has received generally mixed reviews. Review aggregate Rotten Tomatoes reports that 51% of critics have given the film a positive review based on 95 reviews, with an average score of 5.7/10.[11] Metacritic gave the film an average score of 57/100 based 22 reviews.[12]

Roger Ebert, in a positive review of the film, writes: "Stone has Robert De Niro and Edward Norton playing against type and at the top of their forms in a psychological duel between a parole officer and a tricky prisoner who has his number." [13]

The film was a box office bomb; as of November 11, 2010, the film had grossed US$8,463,124, which is approximately one-third of its production budget.[1]

Awards[edit]

Milla Jovovich received the Hollywood Spotlight Award for her work in Stone at the 14th Annual Hollywood Awards Gala at The Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Stone (2010) - Box Office Mojo". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 17, 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d "De Niro flick films in Ypsilanti". Ann Arbor News. Ann Arbor News. Retrieved November 18, 2009.
  3. ^ a b Tim Clodfelter. "Top actors film MacLachlan screenplay". Winston-Salem Journal. Winston-Salem Journal. Retrieved November 18, 2009.[dead link]
  4. ^ a b c Tatiana Siegel (May 6, 2009). "De Niro, Norton to star in Stone". Variety. Retrieved November 18, 2009.
  5. ^ "Martin Sheen, Frances Conroy And Brian Geraghty To Star In "The Subject Was Roses"". Theater in Los Angeles. Theater in Los Angeles. Archived from the original on 15 January 2010. Retrieved January 25, 2010.
  6. ^ a b "Robert De Niro and Edward Norton to star in 'Stone'". shockya.com. Retrieved November 18, 2009.
  7. ^ "Robert De Niro, Edward Norton filming new movie "Stone" at Southern Michigan Correctional Facility in Jackson". mlive.com. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  8. ^ "De Niro accosted by drunk fan on movie set". Thaindian News. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  9. ^ "Robert De Niro - De Niro accosted by drunk fan". ContactMusic.com. Retrieved August 4, 2009.
  10. ^ "Edward Norton in Austin for premiere of 'Stone'" News 8 Austin. Sep 25, 2010.
  11. ^ "Stone Movie Reviews, Pictures". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2010-10-21.
  12. ^ "Stone (2008):Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 2010-10-21.
  13. ^ "Stone :: rogerebert.com :: Reviews". www.suntimes.com. October 13, 2010. Retrieved 2013-01-10.

External links[edit]