Susan M. Natali

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Sue Natali
Born (1969-07-18) July 18, 1969 (age 49)
Elmwood Park, New Jersey
Alma materVillanova University (BS) Stony Brook University (PhD)
OccupationAssociate Scientist at Woods Hole Research Center
Websitehttp://whrc.org/staff/susan-natali/

Susan M. Natali is an associate scientist at the Woods Hole Research Center, where her research focuses on the impact of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems, primarily on Arctic permafrost.[1]

Background and education[edit]

Sue Natali was born on July 18, 1969 and was raised in Elmwood Park, New Jersey. She has three sisters and a brother. In 1991, Natali graduated from Villanova University where she received a B.S. in biology, and in 2008 she completed her Ph.D. in ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University.[1] Natali worked with academic advisors Manuel Lerdau and Sergio Sañudo-Wilhelmy at Stony Brook University while pursuing her Ph.D., and wrote her thesis on the "Effects of Elevated CO2 on Trace Metal Cycling in Plants and Soils".[2]

Career and research[edit]

After completing her Ph.D. in 2008, Natali became a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Florida, where she was employed as a postdoctoral associate until 2010.[1] From 2010 to 2012, Natali was appointed as a postdoctoral research fellow of the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs.[1] Afterwards, Natali joined the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) as an assistant scientist, and in 2015 was appointed as an associate scientist at the WHRS where she currently conducts research.

Notably, Natali conducted an experiment that tests how periods of warming and the thawing of tundra permafrost might impact the carbon cycle.[1] In 2015, Natali conducted a experiment in the Arctic tundra to examine the impacts soil drying has on the release of carbon and methane into the atmosphere.[1][3][4] She found that the drying of tundra soil drastically increases the amount of carbon and methane emitted into the atmosphere as permafrost thaws.[4] Natali's research has been publicized by the New York Times and CBS News.[5][6]

Natali strives to bring the thawing of permafrost and its adverse impacts to the public eye, and has done so through participation in interviews and speaking on public radio programs.[7][8] She also works as a leader of the Polaris Project,[7] which is an initiative to engage undergraduate students in research of Arctic permafrost.[9] The project is funded by the National Science Foundation.[10] Natali was also invited to speak at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference about the importance of recognizing permafrost as a significant contributor to carbon emissions and climate change.[10]

Major publications[edit]

These are some of Natali's most cited publications:

  • Climate change and the permafrost carbon feedback (2015)[11]
  • Climate change: High risk of permafrost thaw (2011)[12]
  • Increased plant productivity in Alaskan tundra as a result of experimental warming of soil and permafrost (2012)[13]
  • Expert assessment of vulnerability of permafrost carbon to climate change (2013)[14]
  • Effects of experimental warming of air, soil and permafrost on carbon balance in Alaskan tundra (2011)[15]
  • Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release from soils, streams, and wildfire: an expert assessment (2016)[16]
  • Permafrost degradation stimulates carbon loss from experimentally warmed tundra (2014)[17]

Awards and fellowships[edit]

In 2006, Natali was awarded the Association for Women in Science Ruth Satter Predoctoral Award. From 2006 to 2007 she was granted a U.S. Department of Energy Global Change Education Program graduate fellowship. The National Science Foundation elected Natali as a graduate research fellow from 2004 to 2008, and as a Polar Programs Postdoctoral research fellow from 2010 to 2012.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Susan M. Natali, Ph.D. – Woods Hole Research Center". whrc.org. Retrieved 2018-11-12.
  2. ^ Natali, Susan M.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.; Lerdau, Manuel T. (2009-04-30). "Plant and Soil Mediation of Elevated CO2 Impacts on Trace Metals". Ecosystems. 12 (5): 715–727. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.319.8306. doi:10.1007/s10021-009-9251-7. ISSN 1432-9840.
  3. ^ "Simulating a Warmer, Drier Arctic - Eos". Eos. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  4. ^ a b Natali, Susan M.; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Mauritz, Marguerite; Schade, John D.; Celis, Gerardo; Crummer, Kathryn G.; Johnston, Catherine; Krapek, John; Pegoraro, Elaine (March 2015). "Permafrost thaw and soil moisture driving CO2 and CH4 release from upland tundra". Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences. 120 (3): 525–537. doi:10.1002/2014jg002872. ISSN 2169-8953.
  5. ^ Fountain, Henry. "Alaska's Permafrost Is Thawing". Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  6. ^ "Alaska's thawing permafrost puts huge portions of state's foundation at risk". Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  7. ^ a b Inc., Mindshare Studios. "Expert Q&A: Dr. Sue Natali » Leaf Litter Newsletter » Biohabitats Inc". staging.biohabitats.com. Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  8. ^ International, Living on Earth / World Media Foundation / Public Radio. "Living on Earth: Losing Frozen Earth Could Cook the Planet". Living on Earth. Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  9. ^ "Preparing For The Arctic: Field Training For Field Success". Polar Field. Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  10. ^ a b Inc., Mindshare Studios. "Expert Q&A: Dr. Sue Natali » Leaf Litter Newsletter » Biohabitats Inc". staging.biohabitats.com. Retrieved 2018-11-14.
  11. ^ Schuur, E. A. G.; McGuire, A. D.; Schädel, C.; Grosse, G.; Harden, J. W.; Hayes, D. J.; Hugelius, G.; Koven, C. D.; Kuhry, P. (April 2015). "Climate change and the permafrost carbon feedback". Nature. 520 (7546): 171–179. doi:10.1038/nature14338. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 25855454.
  12. ^ Schuur, Edward A. G.; Abbott, Benjamin (2011-11-30). "Climate change: High risk of permafrost thaw". Nature. 480 (7375): 32–33. doi:10.1038/480032a. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 22129707.
  13. ^ Natali, Susan M.; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Rubin, Rachel L. (2011-11-16). "Increased plant productivity in Alaskan tundra as a result of experimental warming of soil and permafrost". Journal of Ecology. 100 (2): 488–498. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2745.2011.01925.x. ISSN 0022-0477.
  14. ^ Schuur, E. A. G.; Abbott, B. W.; Bowden, W. B.; Brovkin, V.; Camill, P.; Canadell, J. G.; Chanton, J. P.; Chapin, F. S.; Christensen, T. R. (2013-03-26). "Expert assessment of vulnerability of permafrost carbon to climate change". Climatic Change. 119 (2): 359–374. doi:10.1007/s10584-013-0730-7. ISSN 0165-0009.
  15. ^ NATALI, SUSAN M.; SCHUUR, EDWARD A. G.; TRUCCO, CHRISTIAN; HICKS PRIES, CAITLIN E.; CRUMMER, KATHRYN G.; BARON LOPEZ, ANDRES F. (2011-02-01). "Effects of experimental warming of air, soil and permafrost on carbon balance in Alaskan tundra". Global Change Biology. 17 (3): 1394–1407. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02303.x. ISSN 1354-1013.
  16. ^ Abbott, Benjamin W.; Jones, Jeremy B.; Schuur, Edward A. G.; III, F. Stuart Chapin; Bowden, William B.; Bret-Harte, M. Syndonia; Epstein, Howard E.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Harms, Tamara K. (2016). "Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release from soils, streams, and wildfire: an expert assessment". Environmental Research Letters. 11 (3): 034014. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/11/3/034014. ISSN 1748-9326.
  17. ^ Natali, Susan M.; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Webb, Elizabeth E.; Pries, Caitlin E. Hicks; Crummer, Kathryn G. (March 2014). "Permafrost degradation stimulates carbon loss from experimentally warmed tundra". Ecology. 95 (3): 602–608. doi:10.1890/13-0602.1. ISSN 0012-9658.