Sustainable Cleveland

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Sustainable Cleveland (also called Sustainable Cleveland 2019) is a program developed by the city of Cleveland, Ohio in the United States. It aims to make Cleveland a sustainable city by the year 2019.[1] Each year the program focuses on a specific initiative.[2] It was started by Cleveland mayor Frank G. Jackson in 2009.[3] Twenty-five people were appointed to the program council by Jackson.[4] Andrew Watterson was named, by Jackson, Cleveland's Chief of Sustainability and the head of Sustainable Cleveland in 2009.[5] Jenita McGowan replaced Watterson in 2012.[6]

The 2012 initiative focused on improving the amount of local food produced, sold to the public, and used by restaurants.[7] Sustainable Cleveland holds an annual summit, focused on year-specific initiatives including local food growth and renewable energy. Jeremy Rifkin, David Cooperrider, and Kathleen Merrigan have spoken at the summit.[3]

The 2013 Summit will focus on Advanced and Renewable Energy.[8] The following topics correspond to future years:

  • 2014 – Waste
  • 2015 – Clean Water
  • 2016 – Transportation
  • 2017 – Green Space
  • 2018 – Neighborhoods
  • 2019 - People[2]

Sustainable Cleveland is also driven by working groups, which form from annual summits. [9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About". Sustainable Cleveland. Retrieved 24 December 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Celebration Topics". Sustainable Cleveland. Retrieved 3 January 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Funk, John (19 September 2012). "Sustainable Cleveland 2019's annual summit begins Thursday". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 24 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "Mayor Jackson appoints new chief of sustainability, appoints Sustainable Cleveland 2019 Council and plans for a 2010 summit". State News Service. Retrieved 24 December 2012. (subscription required)
  5. ^ Trickey, Erick (1 December 2009). "Green light: Cleveland's new chief of sustainability says building businesses on eco-friendly ideals is the way to a brighter economic future for the region". Inside Business. Retrieved 24 December 2012. (subscription required)
  6. ^ Tullis, Matt (1 March 2012). "Cash crops: Cleveland's new chief of sustainability hopes to make the year of local food a bounty for economic development". Inside Business. Retrieved 24 December 2012. (subscription required)
  7. ^ Funk, John (24 September 2011). "Sustainable Cleveland 2019: Local food movement could create 28,000 new jobs". The Plain Dealer. Retrieved 24 December 2012. 
  8. ^ "City of Cleveland :: Sustainable Cleveland 2019 (SC2019)". City of Cleveland. Retrieved 3 January 2013. 
  9. ^ "Working Groups". Sustainable Cleveland. Retrieved 3 January 2012. 

External links[edit]