Swimming at the 2000 Summer Olympics – Women's 100 metre breaststroke

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Women's 100 metre breaststroke
at the Games of the XXVII Olympiad
Venue Sydney International Aquatic Centre
Date 17 September 2000 (heats &
semifinals)
18 September 2000 (final)
Competitors 44 from 37 nations
Winning time 1:07.05 AM
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Megan Quann  United States
2nd, silver medalist(s) Leisel Jones  Australia
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Penny Heyns  South Africa
← 1996
2004 →
Swimming events at the
2000 Summer Olympics
Swimming pictogram.svg
Freestyle
50 m   men   women
100 m men women
200 m men women
400 m men women
800 m women
1500 m men
Backstroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Breaststroke
100 m men women
200 m men women
Butterfly
100 m men women
200 m men women
Individual medley
200 m men women
400 m men women
Freestyle relay
4×100 m men women
4×200 m men women
Medley relay
4×100 m men women

The women's 100 metre breaststroke event at the 2000 Summer Olympics took place on 17–18 September at the Sydney International Aquatic Centre in Sydney, Australia.[1]

At only 16 years of age, U.S. swimmer Megan Quann fulfilled her merciless prediction by knocking off South Africa's defending Olympic champion Penny Heyns in the event. Coming from third at the final turn, she surged powerfully past the champion over the last 25 metres to snatch the gold medal in a new American record of 1:07.05, just a small fraction closer to an Olympic standard.[2][3] Australia's overwhelming favorite Leisel Jones, who just turned 15, roared back from fifth place on the final stretch to take home the silver in 1:07.49. Heyns, who was struggling with her form in the prelims and semifinals, seized off a strong lead under a world-record pace (31.10), but ended up only with a bronze in a time of 1:07.55. Meanwhile, Sarah Poewe, the fastest qualifier for the final, trailed behind her teammate by three-tenths of a second in 1:07.85.[4][5][6]

Outside the 1:08-club, Hungary's Ágnes Kovács finished fifth in 1:08.09, and was followed in sixth by Japan's Masami Tanaka with a time of 1:08.37. Aussie favorite Tarnee White (1:09.09) and 31-year-old Sylvia Gerasch (1:09.86), a product of the old East German system, closed out the field.[6]

Notable swimmers missed out the top 8 final, featuring Quann's teammate Staciana Stitts, who had a poor start on the morning prelims with an eighteenth-place effort; and Angola's Nádia Cruz, the first for her nation to compete in all four editions of the Games since 1988.[7]

Records[edit]

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Penny Heyns (RSA) 1:06.52 Sydney, Australia 23 August 1999
Olympic record  Penny Heyns (RSA) 1:07.02 Atlanta, United States 21 July 1996

Results[edit]

Heats[edit]

[8]

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 5 4 Megan Quann  United States 1:07.48 Q
2 6 4 Penny Heyns  South Africa 1:07.85 Q
3 6 3 Leisel Jones  Australia 1:07.92 Q
4 4 5 Sarah Poewe  South Africa 1:08.06 Q
5 4 3 Tarnee White  Australia 1:08.35 Q
6 5 5 Ágnes Kovács  Hungary 1:08.50 Q
7 4 4 Masami Tanaka  Japan 1:09.12 Q
8 6 6 Sylvia Gerasch  Germany 1:09.31 Q
9 4 2 Brigitte Becue  Belgium 1:09.38 Q
10 4 7 Christin Petelski  Canada 1:09.57 Q
11 5 3 Svitlana Bondarenko  Ukraine 1:09.60 Q
12 6 2 Rhiannon Leier  Canada 1:09.68 Q
13 5 6 Qi Hui  China 1:09.88 Q
14 6 7 Simone Karn  Germany 1:09.94 Q
15 5 8 Nataša Kejžar  Slovenia 1:10.44 Q, NR
16 6 8 Madelon Baans  Netherlands 1:10.47 Q
17 5 1 Olga Bakaldina  Russia 1:10.53
18 6 5 Staciana Stitts  United States 1:10.54
19 4 6 Li Wei  China 1:10.55
20 5 7 Heidi Earp  Great Britain 1:10.56
21 5 2 Alicja Pęczak  Poland 1:10.57
22 6 1 Emma Igelström  Sweden 1:11.09
23 2 6 İlkay Dikmen  Turkey 1:11.51 NR
24 3 4 Elvira Fischer  Austria 1:11.58
25 4 8 Byun Hye-young  South Korea 1:11.64
26 3 1 Isabel Ceballos  Colombia 1:11.90 NR
27 3 7 Agata Czaplicki  Switzerland 1:13.19
28 3 5 Joscelin Yeo  Singapore 1:13.25
29 3 3 Emma Robinson  Ireland 1:13.41
30 3 2 Smiljana Marinović  Croatia 1:13.49
31 3 6 Imaday Nuñez Gonzalez  Cuba 1:13.91
32 2 4 Siow Yi Ting  Malaysia 1:13.92
33 2 3 Íris Edda Heimisdóttir  Iceland 1:14.07
34 2 5 Olga Moltchanova  Kyrgyzstan 1:14.41
35 3 8 Jenny Rose Guerrero  Philippines 1:15.14
36 2 2 Caroline Chiu Sin Wing  Hong Kong 1:15.87
37 2 1 Katerine Moreno  Bolivia 1:16.15 NR
38 2 7 Nádia Cruz  Angola 1:19.57
39 2 8 Xenia Peni  Papua New Guinea 1:19.62
40 1 3 Mariam Pauline Keita  Mali 1:37.80
41 1 5 Balkissa Ouhoumoudou  Niger 1:42.39
042 1 4 Doli Akhter  Bangladesh DSQ
042 1 6 Pamela Girimbabazi  Rwanda DSQ
047 4 1 Junko Isoda  Japan DNS

Semifinals[edit]

Semifinal 1[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 5 Sarah Poewe  South Africa 1:07.48 Q
2 3 Ágnes Kovács  Hungary 1:07.79 Q
3 4 Penny Heyns  South Africa 1:08.33 Q
4 6 Sylvia Gerasch  Germany 1:09.33 Q
5 2 Christin Petelski  Canada 1:09.54
6 7 Rhiannon Leier  Canada 1:09.63
7 1 Simone Karn  Germany 1:09.85
8 8 Madelon Baans  Netherlands 1:10.44

Semifinal 2[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Megan Quann  United States 1:07.79 Q
2 5 Leisel Jones  Australia 1:08.03 Q
3 3 Tarnee White  Australia 1:08.61 Q
4 6 Masami Tanaka  Japan 1:09.04 Q
5 2 Brigitte Becue  Belgium 1:09.47
6 1 Qi Hui  China 1:09.81
7 7 Svitlana Bondarenko  Ukraine 1:09.84
8 8 Nataša Kejžar  Slovenia 1:10.66

Final[edit]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) 5 Megan Quann  United States 1:07.05 AM
2nd, silver medalist(s) 6 Leisel Jones  Australia 1:07.49 OC
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 2 Penny Heyns  South Africa 1:07.55
4 4 Sarah Poewe  South Africa 1:07.85
5 3 Ágnes Kovács  Hungary 1:08.09
6 1 Masami Tanaka  Japan 1:08.37
7 7 Tarnee White  Australia 1:09.09
8 8 Sylvia Gerasch  Germany 1:09.86

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Swimming schedule". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 14 September 2000. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "U.S. Swimmers Krayzelburg, Quann Win Gold". ABC News. 18 September 2000. Retrieved 17 June 2013. 
  3. ^ Robertson, Linda (18 September 2000). "Krayzelburg, Quann Pan Olympic Gold". ABC News. Retrieved 17 June 2013. 
  4. ^ "U.S. teenager wins 100 breaststroke". ESPN. 18 September 2000. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  5. ^ Lemke, Gary (18 September 2000). "Penny third as Quann triumphs". Independent Online (South Africa). Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Whitten, Phillip (18 September 2000). "Olympic Day 3 Finals (100 Breast, 100 Back M, 100 Back W, 200 Free)". Swimming World Magazine. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  7. ^ Whitten, Phillip (17 September 2000). "Olympic Prelims: Day Two". Swimming World Magazine. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c "Sydney 2000: Swimming – Women's 100m Breaststroke Heats" (PDF). Sydney 2000. LA84 Foundation. pp. 261–262. Retrieved 17 June 2013. 

External links[edit]