Talk:Afghan biscuit

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First publication of recipe[edit]

I removed the reference [1] as it is not reliable. The Edmonds Cookbook was first published in 1907, not the 1940s. Note that the edition does not include Afghan biscuits (in fact it hardly has any biscuit recipies). The point is that no source has yet been found that demonstrates that Edmonds was the first publisher of the recipe. dramatic (talk) 20:56, 17 February 2009 (UTC)


I have remove the section on origins, as it relies on uninformed speculation by individuals in forums or blog comments. I have commented (in italics) on some of the mentions:

Origins of the Name[edit]

The origin of the name "Afghan biscuit" is a highly debated topic among cookie connoisseurs and history buffs. Theories include

  • Its similarity to the craggy, mountainous landscape of Afghanistan [1] but why Afghanistan, particularly?
  • They were invented by a New Zealand woman to send to her beau posted in Afghanistan during the second or first World War[2] A slight problem in that the recipe seems older than that, plus Afghanistan was neutral territory in World War I, and NZ forces did not participate in the Third Anglo-Afghan war (1919)
  • An Afghan gentleman went to New Zealand and made such an impression on baking day that a biscuit was created in his honor[3] pure speculation
  • Its resemblance to an Afghan male, where the cookie base represents their skin color, the dark chocolate icing their hair, and the walnut kernel the turban[4]

My personal hypothesis (unusable as it is original research is that the name relates to the Second Anglo-Afghan war, which was prominent news during the New Zealand colonial period. (e.g. a major road in Auckland was named for the Khyber Pass)

The list given also omits the Australian camel driver theory, cited on several sites. This is one of the more plausible theories, and just because the biscuit became more common in New Zealand than Australia doesn't mean it can't have Australian origins.dramatic (talk) 20:56, 17 February 2009 (UTC)

The Afghan biscuit has corn flakes as a key ingredient, so logically the recipe cannot have originated prior to corn flakes at least being available, and likely they were first created some time after that. The first newspaper reference to cornflakes being on sale in New Zealand is a 2 7July 1910 newspaper advertistment User:Theodore D|Theodore D]] (talk) 23:32, 8 June 2011 (UTC)
  1. ^ "Biscuit of the Week". Nice Cup of Tea and Sit Down. Retrieved 2009-02-17.
  2. ^ "cookie swap". Laughing Gastronome. Retrieved 2009-02-17.
  3. ^ "cookie swap". Laughing Gastronome. Retrieved 2009-02-17.
  4. ^ "TheCookieTin.com". TheCookieTin.com website. Retrieved 2009-02-17.