Talk:Steel-toe boot

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Note to self for article additions[edit]

Note to self for article additions: Found in idustry trade rag: "Isco (Netherlands) and Arda (Mexico), two companies with a long tradition in manufacturing high quality steel caps, have announced that they have jointly taken over the American Steel Toe Company." The steel toe cap is often hidden beneath leather or rubber, but when you can see them, they are often stamped with "AST". Add picture, if possible. --Mdwyer 19:24, 4 July 2006 (UTC)

I would actually like to know what kind of steel is used in these safety boots and shoes. I work for a steel stamping company and want to "bring on" the safety boot business to our company. Anyone with knowledge of this please email me at kjacobs@ptmcorporation.com.

I just took some of the information from this page like American Steel Toe Company, ISCO, and ARDA and nothing comes up...do they even exist?

Goth/Punk Fashion[edit]

An anon user marked the line about Goth and Punk fashion as NPOV. In response, I removed the whole line. I would argue that boots are goth and punk, but the toe material is immaterial. (hah!) The line mentioned combat boots, which probably have their own entry -- I'm not sure if they have steel toe caps or not. I would welcome a better way to capture this aspect of steel toed boots, though. --Mdwyer 20:37, 20 November 2006 (UTC) Its also pretty common with neonazis and skinheads —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.8.172.96 (talk) 15:33, 23 March 2011 (UTC)

Electrical Hazard (EH) Rated[edit]

I'd really like to know what "resists electrical shocks" means. When a steel-toed shoe/boot is EH compliant, what voltage and current can one safely work around while wearing these steel-toed shoes? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.5.44.21 (talk) 21:31, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

200J impact?[edit]

So what is a 200J impact in real life?

Are we talking dropping a hammer on your foot? A concrete slab? A plank? A sofa? A car?? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.101.174.194 (talk) 23:09, 5 April 2013 (UTC)

If you bothered to read the entry for Joule, you'd learn that 1J is equal to a mass of 100g falling 1 meter so 200J would be equivalent to 20kg(44lb) falling the same distance. A 20L(5gal) jug of water weighs about 20kg.--SEWalk (talk) 14:07, 8 July 2013 (UTC)

why is safety boot the redirect to this instead of the other way around.[edit]

I quote from the article lead:

"A steel-toe boot (also known as a safety boot, steel-capped boot or safety shoe)....... Although traditionally made of steel, the reinforcement can also be made of a composite material, a plastic such as thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) or even Aluminum."

Huh? The second paragraph tells me that "steel - can also be composite material, or a plastic". This looks internally inconsistent to me. An inconsistency that would be solved by renaming the article to safety boot. Arnoutf (talk) 10:58, 7 June 2014 (UTC)

I absolutely agree: in my experience, "steel-toe" shoe/boot is not a common usage in Europe, Asia, and Africa where we generally use "safety shoe/boot". I would therefore suggest changing the title to "Safety footwear" and have "steel-toe boot", "steel-toe shoe", "safety shoe", "safety boot" redirecting to it. Kikeo (talk) 15:32, 27 October 2015 (UTC)
I agree. I've not worn steel for over ten years, composite all the way for me! How come S4 & S5 are not mentioned? S5 is like S3 but also thermic, I can't remember what S4 is though. Yevad (talk) 22:30, 23 May 2018 (UTC)
I'm wrong, S5 isn't thermic. Full standards listing below.Yevad (talk) 22:39, 23 May 2018 (UTC)

Full standards listing[edit]

Source: http://www.hse.gov.uk/foi/internalops/oms/2009/03/om200903app6.pdf Yevad (talk) 22:39, 23 May 2018 (UTC)