Talk:Attachment in adults

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Released June 29, 2006[edit]

This is part of a modification to the organization of attachment-related pages. kc62301

Close Relationships template[edit]

I created a new template for close relationships. I am putting it on this article to get feedback from others. I do not plan to put it on any other attachment related articles. If the consensus is to remove it from this article, I'm okay with that, too. The template can be added to pages by typing {{Close Relationships}} at the top of an article. (Kelly 04:39, 17 July 2006 (UTC))

Do you mean the listing at the top of the page on the right? If so, I really like that and I'd encourage you to leave it there. DPeterson 13:20, 17 July 2006 (UTC)

Yes. That's it. Kelly 13:59, 17 July 2006 (UTC)

Tag on Essay Unwarrented[edit]

I hold a doctoral degree in the social sciences and feel the tagged section reads like a popular science book would read. This is consistent with Wikipedia standards.

Merge with Attachment Theory[edit]

This article is redundant in many sections and should be merged with Attachment Theory. Anthiety (talk) 06:30, 23 February 2011 (UTC)

Many dubious contributions by unidentified editors[edit]

The descriptions of attachment styles have been overrun recently by anonymous IPs adding non-encyclopedic content with no or dubious sources. I have taken a crack at fixing it but more help is needed. Universaladdress (talk) 06:03, 12 August 2012 (UTC)

What is the difference between being a healthy introvert and having an Dismissive Avoidant attachment style?[edit]

Attachment theory is indeed "introvert-negative", for its premise is that people are biologically driven to form attachments with others. The dismissive avoidant attachment style is basically defined as being a "loner" or introverted person. An attachment theorist therefore may consider such an introvert to be suffering from a delusional complex. Namely, having a view that close relationships are relatively unimportant, as well as denying the need for close relationships... hence introverts are openly contradicting their own clear biological needs and desires.

I won't attack here because I have bigger fish to fry, but the Wikipedia article on this is **bogus**. For example:

>"The descriptions of adult attachment styles offered below are based on the relationship questionnaire devised by Bartholomew and Horowitz [6] and on a review of studies by Pietromonaco and Barrett[7]."

Unfortunately this cannot be the case, as reference 7 is a single study by Pietromonaco and Barrett, and reference 6 is merely a proposal of paradigm- and one that has never been tested or validated or implemented.

Maybe this is a clear case of pseudo-psychology, or maybe it's just about the psychology of you and me, and how we may be such that we respond so submissively to the suggestions contained in the writings of the APA, that we can't see for how much and to whom these were sold.

>"Investigators commonly note the defensive character of this attachment style."

Ironically this represents a legitimate defense mechanism of the narrator. In fact the dismissive avoidant attachment style has no defensive character whatsoever. But pointing out the illusory defensiveness of one's opponent effectively creates the illusion of an argument.

>"The desire for independence often appears as an attempt to avoid attachment altogether."

Yes. A desire for independence is reflected in an attempt to avoid attachment. Kind of like how the promotion of attachment often appears as an attempt to undermine introversion altogether.

66.239.61.216 (talk) 11:30, 1 January 2016 (UTC)