Talk:Caribbean Spanish

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Caribbean (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Caribbean, an attempt to build a comprehensive guide to the countries of the Caribbean on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, you can edit this article, or visit the project page, where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion. If you are new to editing Wikipedia visit the welcome page to become familiar with the guidelines.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Languages (Rated Stub-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Languages, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of standardized, informative and easy-to-use resources about languages on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

The coastal people of Ecuador (especially those from the Guayas/Guayaquil region) and the people of eastern Bolivia (particularly those from the department of Santa Cruz) speak a very caribbeanized spanish as well. Even though these territories are not specifically located in the Caribbean, their Spanish language accents are very similar to those of their more northerly neighbors.

What happened to Cuban?[edit]

People from the Caribean region know that Caribbean Spanish hails from the various countries mentioned, and also from Cuba. It is certainly obvious that Cuban spanish has had a major impact in south Florida, in which at least one million native speakers and their pregeny see Cuban spanish as their heritage.

Furthermore, there can be little, if any doubt, that Cuban Spanish is very much a Caribbean language.

Bryan Zimmer 75.73.38.101 (talk) 23:50, 28 May 2010 (UTC)