Talk:Cenél Conaill

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Ireland (Rated NA-class)
WikiProject icon This redirect is within the scope of WikiProject Ireland, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Ireland on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 NA  This redirect does not require a rating on the project's quality scale.
 
WikiProject Northern Ireland (Rated NA-class)
WikiProject icon This redirect is within the scope of WikiProject Northern Ireland, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Northern Ireland on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 NA  This redirect does not require a rating on the project's quality scale.
 


Untitled[edit]

Apparantly the proposed merger (september 2006) haven't raised many comments. For what it's worth, in my adaption of these articles for no:wiki I have merged them, and also included some info from Tyrconnel. Finnrind 11:29, 25 April 2007 (UTC)

    • Strongly Disagree with any merger

Aatomic1 02:43, 28 April 2007 (UTC)

Aatomic1, I find it a little surprising that you have removed a tag proposing a merger, placed by another user october 2006, I thought it was custumary that such proposals should be discussed before they were dismissed. Further, after your edits this article now states that Tir Conaill was founded in the 5th Century, by Niall(died ca 400) as opposed to the traditional view that it was founded by his son Conall, for whom it was named. Could you please take some time to explain your edits. Regards Finnrind 04:54, 28 April 2007 (UTC)

  • I have compared my adjustments with the article as last edited (by yourself). That article states Tir Conaill was founded in the 5th Century, by Niall (died c455) and I have not changed this. I dont have any opinion and if you feel the original article was incorrect it would be helpful if you could correct. Re the merger tag; it had been there for 6 months without comment.

Aatomic1 20:11, 28 April 2007 (UTC)

Thank you for your explanation. My latest edit was simply adding iw:no, the articles statement was slightly different from what you qoute above but still confusing and inaccurate. I apoligise for blaming you for this inaccuracy. I have tried to harmonise the article now according to the articles about Niall and Tir Conaill. Re the merger tag the guidelines might differ from language to language, as it was not placed by myself and I do not have any strong opinions about this myself, I rest my case ;-). Happy editing, Finnrind 20:50, 28 April 2007 (UTC)
The article on Tír Conaillshould absolutely not be merged with that of Cenel Conaill, but rather with the much more extensive article on Tyrconnell, which is the common vernacular anglicised version of the Gaelic original Tir Conaill. They refer to the same territory, whereas Cenel Conaill refers to the related kinship group. Seneschally 16:55, 20 May 2007 (UTC)
Absolutely agree with the above, No merge' Tir Conaill is geographical, whereas Cenel Conaill is a kindred that was supra-national, with members becoming part of the Royal Houses of Scotland, England, Norway and France. Agree with the merge of Tyrconnel and Tir Conaill, however where is the "ponc séimhithe" of the "Conaill" Brendandh 11:37, 18 June 2007 (UTC)

A Families section?[edit]

surnames w connections ie Irwin Cannon Boyle McKay Wemyss etc —Preceding unsigned comment added by Kindred of St. Columba (talkcontribs) 01:47, 8 March 2008 (UTC)


controversy[edit]

Ui Neilll?

The origin of early medieval Donegal, as it was understood for many centuries, represented a carefully-built construct of two distinct phases in Irish historiography. The earlier stratum began in the eighth century when historians promoted the political supremacy of the Uí Néill (particularly Cenél nEógain) in tandem with the ecclesiastical primacy of Armagh. Lacey identifies the likely sponsors of this ambitious intellectual and propaganda enterprise as Áed Allán (d. 743), Cenél nEógain king of Tara, and Congus (d. 750), bishop of Armagh. Their burst of literary activity involved a ruthless redaction (Lacey likens it to ‘Stalinization’) of the early annals, genealogies, and regnal lists that projected the political alignment of the eighth-century back, conveniently beyond the time of memory, into the largely undocumented fifth century. Contemporaneous with that editorial process, scholars began designating a dozen peoples in the northwest, led chiefly by Cenél Conaill and Cenél nEógain, under a new rubric: Uí Néill in Tuaiscirt. Lacey collectively labels their territory ‘the Donegal kingdoms.’ Drawing on recent scholarship by Thomas Charles-Edwards, Ailbhe Mac Shamhráin, and others, he makes a compelling case for their biological distinctiveness from those midland peoples traditionally regarded as nepotes Néill.

Move[edit]

I redirected the article to Northern Uí Néill. Mabuska (talk)