Talk:Cetinje Octoechos

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I don't think they should be merged, as they appear to relate to different books. But both claim to be the earliest Cyrillic printed books and the other has the earlier date - this should be sorted out. Does "Oktoih" mean "Psalter"? If so both articles should have more specific titles, and should explain the term. Johnbod 03:46, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

- "The other" is Oktoikh Johnbod 04:26, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

Oktoih[edit]

The Oktoih is not the Book of Psalms or Psalter. It is the Book of Eight Tones, known as the Octoechos in Greek and as the Oktoih or Oktoikh (depending on how you transliterate the Cyrillic letter X) in Slavonic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octoechos_(liturgy). The page refers to it as "a book of liturgical hymns for singing in eight parts." This erroneusly implies that it is some kind of part-book for polyphonic singing. Not so. Like the system of Gregorian Chant, the Octoechos uses eight modes or tones. Thus, the individual volumes would be more accurately referred to in English as "Octoechos, tone 1" and "Octoechos, tone 5" rather than "Oktoih, the first voice" and "Oktoih, the fifth voice". —Preceding unsigned comment added by 38.116.196.130 (talk) 17:41, 6 November 2008 (UTC)

Language[edit]

Oktoih coudn't be printed in Montenegrin. It was printed by Serbian monks, so only language in question is Serbian (or Serboslavic, the Serbian variant of Church Slavonic). -- Bojan  Talk  10:36, 5 May 2010 (UTC)

I will add Old Church Slavonic. Is it ok now?Rave92(talk) 19:29, 5 May 2010 (UTC)

By the end of 15th century Old Church Slavonic was already replaced by Serboslavic. -- Bojan  Talk  19:58, 5 May 2010 (UTC)