Talk:Court uniform and dress in the United Kingdom

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[Untitled][edit]

Bold textThis article atm implies that Windsor full dress was/is the only kind of dress worn at court, while this page cites a book with a long list of the different varieties of court dress. I propose moving back the current data to Windsor uniform and writing a short stub saying that Windsor dress was just one kind out of the many types of court dress. At the moment the article is quite misleading. Greentubing 04:04, 4 February 2006 (UTC)

This certainly needs work. It doesn't use the expression "Windsor Uniform" however. This term only applies to the special uniform - or really formal evening dress rather than uniform - worn by members of the royal family. Ncox 04:12, 4 February 2006 (UTC)

Surely the dress with yellow braid is Windsor full dress uniform, with the evening dress (livery colours) version being the undress version. See this UK government website which indeed describes the dinner jacket as a uniform and this page (Canadian government website) which clearly shows and identifies full dress Windsor uniform. I think that unless there is evidence to the contrary I am justified in moving back this information to Windsor uniform. Comment spent. Greentubing 04:18, 4 February 2006 (UTC)

Disambiguation or Merging[edit]

I think we need to disambiguate this page from Court_dress There seems some overlap with the legal dress so perhaps it may be a case of merging them together.Alci12 18:29, 1 April 2006 (UTC)

  • I would think a merger would cause more problems, simply because the article would be in danger of getting too big. There is a clear enough distinction between the two categories of dress.Ncox 21:46, 25 November 2006 (UTC)

Women's court dress[edit]

The "female" dress section needs to be hugely expanded. This looks to be related to a unique period (not specified) (in particular, trains were not always suspended from the shoulder). There is no mention of the fossilization of side-hoops with Regency style gowns, certainly one of the more bizarre manifestations of court dress in history. Is there an expert in the house? - PKM 23:03, 27 December 2006 (UTC)

Culture Specificity[edit]

This article seems to primarily refer to court dress at the British royal court; that's where all of the examples are drawn from. It ought to either include examples from other cultures as well, or explicitly state that it is speaking about the English court.

72.148.206.54 (talk) 14:49, 7 March 2008 (UTC)

Yes, I agree 100% with the above, it should either cover the kinds of court dress (in the European sense I take it) that can be seen outside the UK, and should make clear that the article atm represents a heavily UK-based view.
Court dress is a pan-European thing, and the UK has court dress as a result---the implication is not the other way around. Other nations have elaborate court dress traditions as well, e.g. Russia with an image of Russians in court dress (with sashes of orders, etc.) in the picture to the right.
While "Court dress" without qualification usually refers to European court dress (no surprises there since the English language refers to concepts found in England, which is in Europe :D) perhaps other kinds of costume worn in government from other cultures should be included at some point. E.g. the dress of mandarins in China and its own peculiar traditions such as their embroidered squares.
BTW I added a tag to the top of the article.
118.90.39.252 (talk) 09:36, 9 November 2008 (UTC)
The solution is therefore a simple one. Editors with a knowledge of court dress from nations and cultures other than the United Kingdom should add to the article with the same energy and attention to detail shown by (presumed) British contributors. No-one is trying to exclude them. 210.246.12.75 (talk) 06:03, 17 November 2008 (UTC)
Agree - the solution is simple - let suitably informed writers make their contributions. All will be welcome. Tag removed. FClef (talk) 02:42, 28 August 2009 (UTC)
I replaced another tag: this is not against FClef, but it's more of a WP:CSB issue (that is, as explained right here that English content exists because of UK focussed editors, which is a textbook example of systemic bias in the context of European courtly/noble dress). 118.90.15.97 (talk) 04:54, 22 November 2009 (UTC)
Or rather, to write a broader article, presumably at Court dress. This article is already long enough, and is defined as pertaining to the Court of St. James, one of a potential world-wide series. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 18:14, 4 January 2011 (UTC)

Shoulder wings[edit]

These are present primarily on the uniforms of some military musicians in various countries, but I can't find out what their correct name is. Help appreciated --Koakhtzvigad (talk) 01:56, 6 October 2009 (UTC)

I am not sure either. They seem to become popular in the 17th/18th (?) centuries with the various German armies. It may be hangover of having distinctive musician/drummer uniforms with the stripes ... But does it belong here? 118.90.15.97 (talk) 04:56, 22 November 2009 (UTC)
In the German context they were known as Swallows Nests. But in the British context they are simply known as Shoulder Wings, and were worn by members of the Flank Companies (Grenadier and Light Companies) as well as the Band and Drums. Today only certain regiments are entitled to wear them. Bob the Bandy (talk) 01:12, 21 September 2012 (UTC)

Needs a lead section: What is a court?[edit]

This article is tied with the article on the appearance of judges in trials.

However the usage of the phrase "Royal Court" appears to be different from a "judicial court", though there is no explanation for this difference.

Were they the same thing, but now different? Is a Royal Court just a "fancy dress dance party" vs a "place where judicial law is carried out"?

-- DMahalko (talk) 21:09, 5 December 2012 (UTC)

Wiglessness of British lawmen at the Nuremberg show trials?[edit]

Since the statue adopted for the war-crime proceedings was drawn-up mostly by the Americans in collaboration with the world Jewish Congress under the guidance of the Robinson brothers, guessing the great British 'insularwear' of the court wig got vorboten as not to outshine, overshadow, 'uber it' over the weaker-looking in-house court clothes of the Americans and French. Or mayhap, without an wig to doff, it was British lawmenry's sneaky way of flagging to the world that Nuremberg were showtrials? Nevertherless, atleast the Russians turnt up rightfully clad in high millitarywear. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2A02:C7D:411:1600:5599:345D:C259:EFBC (talk) 00:48, 13 October 2016 (UTC)