Talk:Cryoprecipitate

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Untitled[edit]

Bold textcryoprecipitate


How is it made??

Please do not "correct" the statement about universal donors[edit]

Yes, this is correct. Type "O" is only the universal donor for packed Red Blood Cells, the most commonly used component in transfusion medicine.

To put the immunology simply, type "A" or "B" refers to a structure (a "lock") on the surface of a red blood cell. Type "O" means that neither is present. Anyone with type "A" has anti-B (a "key"), anyone with type "B" has anti-A, and anyone with type "O" has anti-A and anti-B. If you mix "A" with anti-A (i.e. the "key" fits the "lock"), you can get a hemolytic transfusion reaction. Since type O red cells have neither "A" nor "B" it does not matter whether the recipient has either "key" since there is no "lock". Since type AB plasma has neither anti-A nor anti-B, it is also safe since regardless of what "lock" is available there are no "keys."

The short version is that plasma compatibility matters a lot less, and transfusing the wrong plasma rarely causes problems, so teaching "O" as the universal donor makes sense even if it's only partially true. SDY (talk) 00:16, 12 March 2011 (UTC)

Actually, plasma compatibility matters just as much. I think you might be thinking of platelet and cyroprecipitate compatibility which does not matter so much because the volume of antibody-containing plasma in them is low. We always give type-compatible plasma, whereas with cryo and platelets we give whatever we have unless there are special needs. 165.214.14.23 (talk) 18:28, 17 September 2013 (UTC)
Yes, this article looks like it is stating it wrong. O- blood is the universal RBC donor, as you said, but if it is opposite for plasma, that would not make it the universal plasma donor as well. You can't have it both ways. Mikeferm (talk) 18:35, 22 December 2016 (UTC)
The issue with the statement is the word "recipient". AB (no positive or negative) is the universal plasma DONOR whereas the sentence reads "AB+ type is the universal plasma recipient".[1] [2] — Preceding unsigned comment added by 204.187.34.100 (talk) 12:54, 20 January 2017 (UTC)