Talk:Eastern lowland gorilla

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Primates (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Primates, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Primates on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 


Contributions[edit]

The following include my contributions for the current article.

The Eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) also known as the Grauer's gorilla is a subspecies of eastern gorilla endemic to the mountainous forests of eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Eastern Lowland Gorilla is the largest of the four gorilla subspecies. Important populations of this gorilla live within the Kahuzi-Biega and Maiko National Parks and their adjacent forests, the Tayna Gorilla Reserve, the Usala forest and on the Itombwe Massif.

This subspecies is considerably larger and more robust in appearance[citation needed] than the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), having a longer body, longer teeth, a stronger jaw and a broader torso. They have jet black coats like the mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei), although the hair is shorter on the head and body. The male's coat, like that of other gorillas, turns silver at the back as the animal matures. There are many more western lowland gorillas than the eastern variety; compared to a possible total of over 100,000 western lowland gorillas, there are only about 4,000 eastern lowland gorillas in the wild, and only 1 female in captivity at the Antwerp Zoo in Belgium.<ref name="Prince-Hughes66">{{cite book |title= Songs of the Gorilla Nation|last= Prince-Hughes|first= Dawn|authorlink= Dawn Prince-Hughes|coauthors= |year= 1987|publisher= Harmony|location= |isbn=1-4000-5058-8|page= 66|pages= |url= }}</ref>

Habitat and ecology[edit]

Eastern lowland gorillas are predominantly herbivorous, eating mostly leaves. They live in lowland rainforests in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, <ref>{{cite web|title=Eastern Lowland Gorilla|url=http://worldwildlife.org/species/eastern-lowland-gorilla|publisher=World Wildlife Fund|accessdate=23 October 2012}}</ref> with only 600 miles of forest away from the western gorillas, <ref>{{cite journal|last=Dixson|first=A.F.|coauthors=Terry L. Maple, Michael P.Hoff|title=The Gorilla|journal=Science|date=Apr 9|year=1982|month=April|volume=216|issue=4542|pages=171-172|url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/1687946|accessdate=26/09/2012}}</ref>. In fact, the relatively minor differences between the eastern and western gorillas suggests recent divergence, <ref>{{cite journal|last=Dixson|first=A.F.|coauthors=Terry L. Maple, Michael P.Hoff|title=The Gorilla|journal=Science|date=Apr 9|year=1982|month=April|volume=216|issue=4542|pages=171-172|url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/1687946|accessdate=26/09/2012}}</ref>. Specifically, it is believed that the gorillas diverged as a result of a montane forest bridge in the late Pleistocene either from west to east or the converse and later into higher altitudes of Virgunga, <ref>{{cite journal|last=Dixson|first=A.F.|coauthors=Terry L. Maple, Michael P.Hoff|title=The Gorilla|journal=Science|date=Apr 9|year=1982|month=April|volume=216|issue=4542|pages=171-172|url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/1687946|accessdate=26/09/2012}}</ref> where characteristics resulting from colder weather evolved. The region inhabited by Eastern Lowland Gorilla has decreased from 8,100 square miles to 4,600 square miles in the past 50 years, <ref>{{cite web|title=Eastern Lowland Gorilla|url=http://worldwildlife.org/species/eastern-lowland-gorilla|publisher=World Wildlife Fund|accessdate=23 October 2012}}</ref>. This primate species now occupies only 13% of its historical area. Barrier Reefs (talk) 22:22, 23 October 2012 (UTC)

They are known to eat only a few leaves from a single plant, allowing the plant to regrow. They will also eat fruit, seeds, bamboo shoots, and insects. Gorillas also engage in coprophagia; they eat their own feces, as well as the feces of other gorillas.[citation needed] Similar behavior has also been observed among chimpanzees. Such behavior may serve to improve absorption of vitamins or of nutritive elements made available from the re-ingestion of seeds.[citation needed]. Males can weigh 250 kilograms and can reach two metres tall when standing <ref>{{cite web|title=Eastern Lowland Gorilla|url=http://www.fauna-flora.org/species/eastern-lowland-gorilla/|work=Fauna and Flora|publisher=Fauna and Flora International}}</ref> Barrier Reefs (talk) 22:22, 23 October 2012 (UTC)

Size[edit]

size and stuff? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Halaqah (talkcontribs).

Some weight records added. --83.240.11.32 (talk) 18:39, 14 November 2008 (UTC)

infant?[edit]

is infant the proper term? Doesn't infant literally mean "unable to speak?" Aren't all gorillas infants?Hithisishal (talk) 03:38, 8 April 2008 (UTC)

'Infant' is indeed the proper term. While the LAtin root for the word does indeed mean "unable to speak", the English word does not have that meaning. See various dictionary entries for 'infant'. - UtherSRG (talk) 05:53, 8 April 2008 (UTC)

Images[edit]

Three suitable images from Flickr of the Eastern Lowland Gorilla are here, here and here. Cheers, Jack (talk) 14:46, 15 December 2008 (UTC)

The largest subspecies of the Gorilla[edit]

The Eastern Lowland Gorilla is slightly larger than the Mountain Gorilla and essential larger than the Western Lowland Gorilla. Full erectly a Silverback of the Eastern Lowland Gorilla would be roughly 6 feet 6 inches (2 m) tall, a Mountain Gorilla Silverback would be roughly 6 feet 3 inches (1,90 m) tall and a Silverback of the Western Lowland Gorilla would be until 5 feet 7 inches (1,70 m) tall. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 91.7.127.159 (talk) 15:47, 16 July 2010 (UTC)

Proposed Section and Sources[edit]

I am looking at adding several subsections to the "Conservation and Threats" section including: civil war, bushmeat, park conservation, refugees, logging and recommendations. Part of the current "Conservation and Threats" section would therefore not be necessary as it will be used later on under one of the subsections. I also propose adding a new section called "Conservation Initiatives" to list the conservation organizations and their efforts in protecting the species.

Sources:

  • Prince-Hughes, Dawn (1987). Songs of the Gorilla Nation. Harmony. p. 66. ISBN 1-4000-5058-8.
  • United Nations Environmental Programme, C.I.; J. Redmond, J. Refisch (2010). [www. grida.no The Last Stand of the Gorilla: Environmental Crime and Conflict in the Congo]. United Nations Environmental Programme. p. 24. ISBN 978-82-7701-076-2.
  • "Eastern Lowland Gorilla". World Wildlife Fund. Retrieved 23 October 20
  • United Nations Environmental Programme, C.I.; J. Redmond, J. Refisch (2010). [www. grida.no The Last Stand of the Gorilla: Environmental Crime and Conflict in the Congo]. United Nations Environmental Programme. p. 24. ISBN 978-82-7701-076-2.
  • Vogel, Gretchen (Mar. 31, 2000). "Conflict in Congo Threatens Bonobos and Rare Gorillas". Science 287 (5462): 2386-2387. Retrieved 26/09/2012.
  • Hart, Terese et. Al (1997). Conservation and Civil Strife: Two Perspectives from Central Africa. Conservation Biology 11 (2): 308-314.
Barrier Reefs (talk) 18:53, 29 October 2012 (UTC)

With the use of references, I have re-written the Habitat and Ecology Section as well as the Conservation and Threats section. Any additions to these sections would be appreciated! Barrier Reefs (talk) 18:35, 14 November 2012 (UTC)

Well written and detailed. Nice contribution!Respect.compassion (talk) 16:34, 20 November 2012 (UTC)

Peer Review[edit]

Great addition overall, really enjoyed reading this. Few little correction though. Consider moving the social behaviour part (last 2 paragraphs of habitat and ecology) down to the behaviour section. Also one of the citation in the bushmeat subheading is improperly cited. Also on a whole try to link a few more article to the page. Things like "Tanzania" can be linked fairly easily. Kirrahe (talk) 23:51, 21 November 2012 (UTC)

Thanks for your suggestions Kirrahe. I have added more links to all of my sections and have moved those two paragraphs to the behaviour section. Thanks for the help! Barrier Reefs (talk) 15:55, 22 November 2012 (UTC)

Name change?[edit]

Should Grauer's be made the article name? The mechanics of doing so is not my strong suit but I'd figure out how to do it. In the NYTimes today: 'the world’s largest primates, known as Grauer’s gorillas'; it seems to be the accepted species' name. I linked this Eastern lowland article to the redirect page Grauer's gorilla (which redirects ('back') to the Eastern lowland gorilla page) but the link was removed as 'circular redirect'; ok. A full change would effectively involve a 'switch' of the content from here to what's now the redirect page and of the redirect content from there to here. If there's no comment in a few weeks I'll make note here, then proceed. 20:01, 20:13, 20:26 & Swliv (talk) 01:42, 26 April 2016 (UTC)

The name change was part of a significant edit made last March by a user with very few edits. Have those changes been reviewed? They may be unreliable. They didn't add any new references. jnestorius(talk) 17:56, 7 September 2016 (UTC)

What is the source for the claim that Eastern gorillas weigh between "204-250 kilograms?"[edit]

I thought it was a well-known fact that Eastern gorillas weigh 180-200kg in average. Sentido33 (talk) 21:55, 7 August 2017 (UTC)