Talk:Forward pass

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Inventor of the forward pass[edit]

The article on Harvard University says that the forward pass was invented by "Yale coach Walter Camp", but this article says "Eddie Cochem, the Saint Louis University coach, was the first to use the forward pass in 1906". Which is it? --  timc  talk   20:30, 21 September 2006 (UTC)

Edited out "except in the Rugby World Cup 2007 quarterfinal, France vs New Zealand" from the section on forward pass. Seems to me to be vandalism based on the controversy over the recent France v New Zealand rugby game. 130.160.222.169 15:19, 7 October 2007 (UTC)

Photograph[edit]

Is there a better photograph than that one? In particular, why is the QB in black when everyone else is in either orange or white? Samer (talk) 14:49, 20 October 2008 (UTC)

To answer the second question, the picture was taken at a scrimmage, and to reduce the risk of injury, quarterbacks aren't allowed to be hit. That's why he has the different jersey, to indicate he's "off limits" to being hit.
As for the first, the question is also whether there's a better free image available. IMO, an image where the quarterback and receiver were in the shot would be better. —C.Fred (talk) 16:32, 20 October 2008 (UTC)

POV?[edit]

This article reads like an article primarily for American football yet forward passes are also linked to rugby and are banned. The rugby section of this article needs to be largely improved —Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.185.220.58 (talkcontribs) 03:57, 1 May 2010 (UTC)

The issue is that forward passes are illegal in both rugby codes, so that only a minimal amount of information is relevant on them. Forward passes are legal in American/Canadian football, so there is more material to be covered (early history, evolution, and the relationships between passing and ball shape, rules, and strategy). —C.Fred (talk) 04:14, 1 May 2010 (UTC)

That's not the issue at all, there's a lot of in depth information about forward passes, the simple fact however is the lack of understanding of the rules of rugby by most Americans. Furthermore I don't recall it being called anything more than a pass in most American football matches. This article is dominated inherently by a pass that isn't even named as such in commentary. I understand the action is that of a forward pass, but even then it's entirely different from a rugby forward pass. I would go as far as to say that in rugby it is an entirely different concept. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 123.211.242.221 (talk) 00:42, 5 May 2010 (UTC)

Arguably, the rugby forward pass throw forward could be taken out of this article entirely, since the analogous gridiron concept is popularly called a forward lateral: a pass where the intent is to throw the pass backward, but it actually goes forward. The type of passing covered here—intentionally throwing the ball forward—would result in a penalty kick if attempted in a rugby match. As for the nomenclature, yes, announcers say "pass" when they typically mean "forward pass," because that's the vernacular and because the forward pass is the most frequently attempted type of pass; backward passes are often called "pitches" or "laterals." The use of slang by an announcer does not invalidate the term; how often do you hear a rugby announcer say a player has been "cautioned and temporarily suspended"? —C.Fred (talk) 01:17, 5 May 2010 (UTC)

The term forward pass is used in "common vernacular" at least across all Rugby League playing nations. The term forward pass is also defined within the rules of the governing body at least of Australia; I have not investigated the rules for other nations however given that other nations play the same game we can reasonably consider they are using the same rules. The forward pass is well defined within the rules and "common vernacular" of Rugby League at least, I do not pretend to be an expert with regards to rugby union. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 123.211.242.221 (talk) 01:34, 5 May 2010 (UTC)

Touché. I was consulting the rugby union laws and neglected to look at the laws for league. I also watch fewer league matches, so I'm more familiar with announcers for union and across a wide geographic spectrum (Super 14, Currie Cup, Heineken Cup, Premiership). —C.Fred (talk) 01:42, 5 May 2010 (UTC)

Tackle Eligible? (American football)[edit]

I found this (from which I removed "tight" because a split end is also a lineman AND eligible receiver): "Today, the only linemen who can receive a forward pass are the ends and, if they report as eligible prior to the snap, the offensive tackle." But that leaves me confused about this reference to the offensive tackle. What I know about tackle-eligible play is that the formation shifted so that an offensive tackle ended up at one end of the line (and unless he reported as stated, this would not be legal). Should this be further reworded to refer to the players at the ends of the line (which would occasionally include the eligible tackle I referred to)? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.63.16.82 (talk) 20:28, 2 August 2011 (UTC)

Article scope - expand to include hockey?[edit]

The introduction to the article says "In several forms of football a forward pass is when the ball is thrown in the direction that the offensive team is trying to move, towards the defensive team's goal line." Based on that, is there any reason to have a section on the forward pass in ice hockey within this article? —C.Fred (talk) 14:02, 10 August 2011 (UTC)

Don't forget Lacrosse and Basketball and a host of others. Polo anyone? Al Cook USA — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.32.11.142 (talk) 15:33, 8 April 2012 (UTC)

1907 Sewanee-Vandy; trick pass plays[edit]

In 1907 Vanderbilt won the south thanks to a double pass play, Vaughn Blake to Bob Blake to Stein Stone. Grantland Rice said most exciting thing he ever saw. I have to ask, is there an earlier trick-pass play? Cake (talk) 07:03, 4 June 2015 (UTC)