Talk:God Part II

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Song meaning?[edit]

I've long tried to figure out just what this song is getting at. Is it written from the POV of John Lennon, pointing out some contradictions and hypocricy in the process? Or is it written from Bono's POV? Or is it something else entirely?

--208.204.155.241 22:04, 13 December 2006 (UTC)

Steve Stockman in Walk On: The Spiritual Journey Of U2 gives a pretty good account of Bono's reason for the song.

Bono felt that Lennon had got the love concept half right in "All You Need Is Love". He felt that Lennon had left
God out of the discussion to a degree. So the title "God Part 2" puts God back into the discussion, includes the
love concept in the chorus (e.g. "I believe in love")and opens up the concept of "God as love", a reference to
1 John 4 in the New Testament. 
        I think the song also creates contrasts between the ideal man and the real man while at the same time
criticizing modern culture with its excesses and its fantasies. He takes a shot at Goldman, a biographer who
wrote harsh biographies on Lennon and Elvis but also critiques revenge at the same time. He includes Cockburn,
"kicking the darkness til it bleeds daylight", another evangelical who is strong on social justice issues.
The song ends with a final reference to the presence of God.   - Kit Hill, Ed. D. LMFT  
—Preceding unsigned
comment added by 69.109.209.78 (talk) 

11:08, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

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