Talk:Killian documents controversy

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When exactly was the 1973 era?[edit]

... comparing what CBS claimed to be a 1973-era typewritten memo with a proportional-spaced 2004-era Microsoft Word document ...

It's hardly unique to this article but— Is the suffix –era necessary, helpful, or even meaningful? Is it there because someone worried that the numbers might be taken as cardinals ("hey, it's only one memo, not thousands") rather than dates? —Tamfang (talk) 20:20, 4 September 2013 (UTC)

What office equipment from the early 70's could and couldn't do apparently was one of those riddle wrapped in a mystery kind of thingys as far as the 2004-era news media was concerned. Evidently researching things so far back in time was totally beyond the primitive resources that were available in 2004, with very low-powered computers running obsolete operating systems, and a barely functioning Internet that would struggle to even download a low-rez picture. Today, though, practically everyone has access to high powered, modern computers and can use something like "Google" to quickly search a much faster Internet, allowing anyone to easily come up with samples of 1970's documents like this. It's just unfortunate that the news media in the early to mid-2000's did not have the technical resources we have today; otherwise, the story might have had a different ending. -BC aka 209.6.92.99 (talk) 14:44, 2 November 2013 (UTC)
The question has never been what office equipment could do in the 1970s in general, or in Washington, D.C.; the question is what could the office equipment in the office at TXANG in Texas do then? htom (talk) 22:26, 2 November 2013 (UTC)
Ummm, no -- that's been your unanswerable question. As a reminder of how this whole "controversy" started, see this 2004 Seattle Times article. The question was never about what office equipment was physically present at TexANG (although someone there could proportionally print personal letters), it was initially all about how supposedly unusual proportional printing was in those days. That's what drove the forgery claims -- along with the news media unable to bother with gathering up typical samples of military and government memos and letters from around that time to see if proportional printing really was very unusual then and hence suspect.
Actually, since I at least have found few problems finding proportionally printed letters and memos from not just that time period, but from well before then, including from an Adjutant General of the Texas National Guard, then the correct question should be, "Why wouldn't there be any office equipment on base that could proportionally print if best evidence shows that it was not at all uncommon in those days?" If you are accusing someone of forgery, lying, or such, the burden is on you to back up your claims, and not for the accused to prove innocence. And if the initial "evidence" for supporting the accusation turns out to be rubbish, well....
But since you've so far ignored all evidence indicating that proportional printing was not at all that unusual back then, along with how the formatting of the documents is totally compliant with all other similar memos from back then (as well as in keeping with military guides on the topic), I can no doubt safely assume that you will ignore all this to make another completely unsupported, random comment, eh?
This Killian documents business shows the fatal flaw in Wikipedia's democratization of knowledge: if you have enough ideologues who can push through a version of reality counter to best evidence, they will try, especially if it's related to a "sensitive" topic. Given the sorry state journalism has been in for a while now, it's not at all hard to troll for bad, poorly researched info from supposedly reliable sources in order to cook a Wikipedia article. And Wikipedia's depreciation of primary sources relative to secondary sources has greatly aided this. But whatever, it is what it is: there is, and has never been any good evidence for forgery in this case. -BC aka 209.6.92.99 (talk) 22:03, 3 November 2013 (UTC)
Your beliefs are not evidence. htom (talk) 01:59, 4 November 2013 (UTC)
 ??? You're the one with all the beliefs and not one shred of evidence whatsoever to ever support them, remember? I'm the one with all the links and samples, including some from TexANG, showing proportional printing was not at all unusual at that time, as well as to this Texas Monthly article showing that the main instigator of the forgery charges, "Buckhead" aka Harry MacDougald, was a liar. Did you not ever realize that clicking on the colored text in my posts would take you to magical places? -BC aka 209.6.92.99 (talk) 14:28, 4 November 2013 (UTC)

Topic drift, gotta love it. It doesn't often happen so completely so quickly! —Tamfang (talk) 06:56, 14 February 2015 (UTC)

Delete the Opinion of an English Professor on whether a typewriter could produce the Times New Roman-like font[edit]

The opinion of an English teacher is not reliable on the topic of typewriters and what they can produce. The mere fact that an opinion is mentioned in some secondary source, does not justify it as reliable. Thus I have deleted this material which came at the end of a paragraph as if the definitive conclusion. If someone wants to put a statement like that, he needs to quote a typewriter expert. (EnochBethany (talk) 04:47, 14 February 2015 (UTC))