Talk:Litmus

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Indicator chemicals[edit]

The indicator chemical links all return the user to this page, which tells us nothing about the individual chemical structures, properties, etc. These need to be broken out like other chemicals. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.90.124.37 (talk) 18:44, 21 March 2008 (UTC)


Method of measuring ph value using litmus papers[edit]

on my report it says place a fresh piece of blue litmus paper in a test tube of water.using a straw,blow gently into the water for several minutes,until a change in the litmus paper occurs.what does the change show about exhaled breath when it dissolves in water?


And what do you want to know?T.vanschaik 21:53, 23 October 2006 (UTC)

If you exhale into the water and it shows an acidic change, it's likely carbonic (or should that be carboxylic? I forget) acid formed by the dissasociation of CO2 in water. 69.210.62.227 04:45, 30 November 2006 (UTC)

Yes, it's carbonic acid, but the report asks the student to do a simple experiment so the logical thing would be to actually do it.

the same as "indicator strips"?[edit]

is litmus paper analogous to "indicator strips" that my textbook talks about? whoops, forgot to sign. --69.120.54.32 12:32, 6 May 2007 (UTC)

Nobody seems to use capital letters anymore... Litmus is a type of pH indicator. There are many of them, some of which come in the form of strips of paper soaked in the indicator compound. Richard001 06:24, 26 May 2007 (UTC)

Proposed move (2008)[edit]

The following discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.

I propose that this article be moved to Litmus test, and the page that is there be moved to Litmus test (disambiguation). This is the original sense of "litmus test", and all other usages are a metaphor for this one. - furrykef (Talk at me) 17:38, 11 July 2008 (UTC)


The above discussion is closed. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section.

Michael Phelps?[edit]

I'm a fan of Michael Phelps, but the reference to him in this article seems completely irrelevant. If more knowledgeable, wikipedia-savvy users think it's okay, then his name should at least be capitalized. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.22.46.236 (talk) 02:19, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

More info!!![edit]

I need to research about litmus paper but there doesn't seem to be enough info!!! Can you please write more info??

Thanks

More information needed[edit]

I want to know what litmus paper is. What is it? I am researching this for an assignment so I'd like the info ASAP. No offence, but I get really angry and impatient when I wait for a response for a really long time, so you know what I'm like. Either create a page on litmus paper, or include some more precise info on this!!!!! (before I get angry!!!)

Naughtywatermelon (talk) 12:20, 29 May 2010 (UTC) Apryl (Naughtywatermelon)

Move proposal (2010)[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: pages moved. Arbitrarily0 (talk) 23:07, 19 July 2010 (UTC)


Litmus testLitmus — While this article discusses litmus tests as an application, it is primarily concerned with the chemical litmus. Ost (talk) 17:32, 12 July 2010 (UTC)

  • Support move the "Litmus test" article to "Litmus" and redirect "Litmus test" to "Litmus (disambiguation)", per nominator. Litmus is a chemical phenomenon, and the test an application thereof. Note that that the article was originally written so, and that the intro still reads "Litmus is a mixture of...". Most probably it was moved away because somebody wanted it to be about their favourite band or TV show. walk victor falk talk 14:25, 18 July 2010 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.