Talk:Margaret (moon)

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Untitled[edit]

Pronunciation per the OED, tho not precisely for the Shakespearean character, is UK mar'-g@-rit or mar'-grit, with the unaccented i being a high schwa, of course, and US mar-gr@t. kwami 20:27, 3 November 2005 (UTC)

reason for name[edit]

Perhaps why the Much Ado reference was made in the naming from the works of Shakespeare(using a much lesser-known Margaret when other Margarets are in the historical plays) -- it pokes fun with an inside joke about the current real world Much-Ado being made about 2003 EL61, 2003 UB313 and Pluto and names, and naming, etc. --69.173.148.39 21:40, 5 November 2005 (UTC)

This edit had deleted the following:

And also, you've missed why the Much Ado reference was made: it's an injoke among the discoverers about the current real world Much-Ado being made about 2003 EL61, 2003 UB313 and Pluto and names, and naming, etc. --Sturmde 17:04, 4 November 2005 (UTC)

Blimey, that's way too subtle for me. My guess is it's named after someone's mother, and they found a name from Shakespeare to justify it! The Singing Badger 21:46, 5 November 2005 (UTC)

Sturmde (I just restored his comment, which I had copied from another page) states that it is an in-joke; perhaps he has evidence to back up this assertion. If he does (Sturmde? Are you out there?), this would be nice to include in the main article. kwami 22:02, 5 November 2005 (UTC)


Retrograde[edit]

Sentence from article: "It stands out from the Sycorax group by its inclination, which is only 56.63°, whereas all of the Sycorax group moons are retrograde, with inclinations in the 140-170° range. "

So does Margaret have a retrograde orbit or not? Rmhermen 19:25, 6 November 2005 (UTC)

No, it does not. Their are two ways of indicating a retrograde orbit. A retrograde moon inclined by 10°, in a 6-hour orbit, could be said to have the orbital parameters of 10° and −6 h (in which case no inclination ever exceeds 90°), or of 170° and +6 h (in which case no period is ever negative). It's more common to keep the period positive and let the inclination vary between 90°-180°. You see the same thing with Uranus' inclination vs. rotation. However, Venus is more commonly given a negative rotational period, both because it's so close to zero anyway, and because this gives it an inclination close to its near-twin Earth's. I suppose if we could ever reconstruct whether the impact that walloped Venus early on flipped it over or just reversed its rotation, we'd see a preference for one or the other. kwami 22:53, 6 November 2005 (UTC)
I added some of this to the retrograde article. Rmhermen 17:00, 26 November 2005 (UTC)