Talk:P-Phenylenediamine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Chemicals  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Chemicals, a daughter project of WikiProject Chemistry, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of chemicals. To participate, help improve this article or visit the project page for details on the project.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

Untitled[edit]

It seems the person who wrote this article is more interested in pushing the organic or natural viewpoint than providing straightforward information about this chemical. I would prefer a more straighforward listing of chemical properties.

-Agree. I think this deserves a flagging for not being in the style of a Wikipedia article, too. 87.114.22.50 18:21, 30 September 2006 (UTC)

You can edit the article yourself if you think something is wrong. Federico Grigio, alias Nahraana (talk) 17:25, 20 March 2008 (UTC)
I corrected two different places where the article cited sources but then said exactly the opposite of what the sources said, or worked to give the impression that the chemical was carcinogenic in spite of the cited sources. I also removed some text on the EPA that was plainly copied word for word from sites calling for the EPA to declare the chemical a carcinogen. It would be up the FDA to regulate its use in hair dye and cosmetics in any case. Someone is hell-bent on pushing a viewpoint in this article.173.228.123.116 (talk) 12:45, 20 February 2011 (UTC)


86.174.34.215 (talk) 16:28, 1 April 2015 (UTC)Shezina K Taraaverdi: My knowledge on PPD's comes from tracing a low reading of Cellular ATP output. ATP deals with the energy output from the cells in our body - Cellular energy. Mine was down by 43%. This obviously meant I was constantly running on lowered energy output, which was exactly what was happening to me. So I arranged to have further tests on my DNA to see what was causing the block to the ATP working. The results came back that what was causing corruption of my DNA was in fact two things. One was PPD's from hair dyes and the other was Aluminium also from hair dyes.

Testing anything on rats just because they are mammals is not appropriate, since rats can eat some poisons and other products that we cant digest and still keep on living. So the whole trial would be inappropriate to compare the findings to how PPDs react in human beings and comparing this to rats. I do not and have never knowingly reacted to PPDs in an allergic way outwardly, but it has been proven that my inner body has reacted at the deepest level. I feel on this basis that PPDs need further investigation in relation to health and hair dyes and whether they are truly safe to continue using.

to conclude There is now at least one company using safe dyes that do not contain any PPDs or other chemicals. They are plant based and one of the products is made from seaweed which takes colour out leaving the hair white. this is a basis to86.174.34.215 (talk) 16:28, 1 April 2015 (UTC) add new natural colours. Even so anything we put on our hair as a colour is questionable and plant dyes also are plant chemicals, so it is important to look into how gentle and safe they are to use also. 1.4.2015

Hair dye[edit]

For those of us that are allergic to ppd, the alternatives that are sited in this article are a great resource. I personally appreciate it greatly, regardless if someone thinks it is or is not keeping with wikipedia 'type' articles. 70.197.229.109 (talk) 23:07, 27 June 2008 (UTC)

Is there possibly another chemical present in both hair colour and henna that can cause the same reactions/symptoms? 22:37 , 11 October 2008 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 196.44.200.27 (talk) 20:38, 11 October 2008 (UTC)


Poorly written. The article contradicts itself on carcinogen status. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 66.168.153.147 (talk) 22:47, 8 November 2008 (UTC)

I liked the article, despite what some others have said. It is the first chemical structure I have seen since I started doing research on the rash this hair dye has caused me. The chemical structure alone is invaluable. I would like to see more information and more description of the information contained in the article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.228.90.149 (talk) 20:49, 20 January 2011 (UTC)

Wikipedia is not intended as a medical guide or a manual on your health, aside from the fact that knowledge is healthy. My source indicates that PPD is not used in hair preparations anymore.--Smokefoot (talk) 14:44, 20 February 2011 (UTC)
What is your source for it no longer being used? I can walk into a shop and find several products listing P-Phenylenediamine in their ingredients. dramatic (talk) 01:16, 21 February 2011 (UTC)
Here is what I read "1,4-Diaminobenzene [106-50-3] (p-phenylenediamine) has been the main primary intermediaoutputte used worldwide for more than a 100 years but has nowbeen largely replaced by 2,5-diaminotoluene" The source is ref 2 ("Hair Preparations" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia). Usually a very good source of info. I should stop by the local shop and see what they list as ingredients. --Smokefoot (talk) 03:35, 21 February 2011 (UTC)
According to this article on Medical News, PPD is still used in 2/3 of all hair dyes: http://www.news-medical.net/news/2007/02/05/21700.aspx It is still legal in the EU as an ingredient in hair dye (although some member countries have outlawed this use), but has been outlawed as an ingredient in skin dye (tattoos). If you have any doubts, just try to find hair dye products (it is usually not used in extremely blonde dyes, since that is not adding new color) in stores or online, it is very difficult unless you want to spend at least 50% more. 70.36.142.97 (talk) 19:03, 23 February 2011 (UTC)
Great find. Obviously someone is wrong somewhere. I will tend to this article tonight or tomorrow taking the emphasis off the claim that PPD is no longer used. --Smokefoot (talk) 19:14, 23 February 2011 (UTC)


Possible health risks from PPDs[edit]

Shezina (talk) 16:28, 1 April 2015 (UTC)Shezina K Taraaverdi: My knowledge on PPD's comes from tracing a low reading of Cellular ATP output. ATP deals with the energy output from the cells in our body - Cellular energy. Mine was down by 43%. This obviously meant I was constantly running on lowered energy output, which was exactly what was happening to me. So I arranged to have further tests on my DNA to see what was causing the block to the ATP working. The results came back that what was causing corruption of my DNA was in fact two things. One was PPD's from hair dyes and the other was Aluminium also from hair dyes.

Testing anything on rats just because they are mammals is not appropriate, since rats can eat some poisons and other products that we cant digest and still keep on living. So the whole trial would be inappropriate to compare the findings to how PPDs react in human beings and comparing this to rats. I do not and have never knowingly reacted to PPDs in an allergic way outwardly, but it has been proven that my inner body has reacted at the deepest level. I feel on this basis that PPDs need further investigation in relation to health and hair dyes and whether they are truly safe to continue using.

to conclude There is now at least one company using safe dyes that do not contain any PPDs or other chemicals. They are plant based and one of the products is made from seaweed which takes colour out leaving the hair white. this is a basis to86.174.34.215 (talk) 16:28, 1 April 2015 (UTC) add new natural colours. Even so anything we put on our hair as a colour is questionable and plant dyes also are plant chemicals, so it is important to look into how gentle and safe they are to use also. 1.4.2015 Hair dye — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kreszia (talkcontribs) 16:49, 1 April 2015 (UTC)