Talk:Rúgbrauð

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Comments[edit]

It immideately striked me that the depicted " Rúgbraud " ( keyboard lacks icelandic letters)showed total resemblence to danish rugbrød, and by clicking the photo, a series of 3 consecutive variations of it´s origin, showing slight undergoing editorial changes supported my suspicion.The original photo had a text to it showing that this was inarguable a genuine danish homemade rugbrød all the way, and is by the way identical to the one shown on the wiki entry for "Rugbrød". Furthermore Im not sure what is suggested by the reference to modern danish rugbrød containing wheat ( !? ) and how would the adding of whole grain possibly make the bread less dense ?( - the bread in the picture being clearly stuffed with whole grain.. ) Rugbrød is indeed a core-danish food and it´s recipe does not include other types of meal than rye, it would then be labeled something other fx " Landbrød " ," Frisisk Bondebrød " or alike.The tradition of soaking stored dry (rye ! -)crumbs and crusts and simmer it together with different ingredients such as dried fruit, raisins etc doesn´t seem too far from the principle in the making of Øllebrød,being basically Øl + Brød ( beer + bread )handled in the described manner and sometimes also served up with whipped cream.The reference to the nickname thunderbread from the causing of inrestrainable urge to loudly release internal storms brings to mind that the german word pumpernickel supposedly means something like a farting pixie.. Flight714 (talk) 08:38, 28 May 2011 (UTC)

The image is misleading. The bread shown is very different from the common icelandic rúgbrauð which is without whole grain added. The image does however show a bread that an Icelander would not hesitate to call rúgbrauð as the word simply means "rye bread", but it is still very different from the common/usual Icelandic rúgbrauð. Also, Icelandic rúgbrauð is (I think) usually not made with sourdough but baking soda, but this may again be a modern characteristic. In the first Icelandic cookbook ([1]) rúgbrauð is said to be basically a Danish homebaked bread made with sourdough. Very little is then said about such breads as they required ovens which were practically non-existent in Iceland at that time (around 1800) so it is possible even that Icelandic rúgbrauð as we know it today did not exist until late 19th century. As it is, however, it is quite different in both taste and texture from Danish rugbrod or the German pumpernickel (interesting what you said about the German name :) ) --Akigka (talk) 14:14, 7 September 2011 (UTC)