Talk:Schwa (Cyrillic)

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Unclear Language[edit]

What does "In all Cyrillic alphabets it presented the vowel sound /æ/, because the same sound was presented by the latin letter Schwa in Janalif, the pan-Turkic alphabet, before all languages that used them were switched to Latin." mean? —Firespeaker 12:30, 21 March 2006 (UTC)

Tatar latin[edit]

Tatar's latin alphabet *is* in common use, at least in some contexts; see the Tatar wikipedia for a really big example. —Firespeaker 12:30, 21 March 2006 (UTC)

How is it a Cyrillic Letter?[edit]

It is a letter used in synthetic, politically-imposed Cyrillic-based alphabets for Turkic tongues, and does not show up in any languages using original Cyrillic, such as Serbian, Ukrainian, Church Slavonic, or any of the Russian alphabets used through the ages. As such, how is it a Cyrillic letter? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Aadieu (talkcontribs) 19:14, 18 August 2009 (UTC)

Azeri/Azerbaijani[edit]

I am almost sure this letter was reintroduced into Azeri after switch to Latin alphabet. Also, Azeris prefer to call their language Azerbaijani. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 77.1.3.99 (talk) 09:55, 9 August 2010 (UTC)