Talk:Scribe (markup language)

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No mention was made of Perfect Formatter, a Scribe clone. Does anyone know of programs converting from Scribe to other languages still available today? I think they existed for TeX and WordPerfect. Doesn't WordPerfect still save documents as a Markup Language? The code it generated ten years ago was far more cumbersome and blatherly than if it had been writen by a human. Has anyone writen VB macros to convert Scribe to Word?

Added citations[edit]

I was the one who created this article first hand, I think this article is important because:

  • Scribe was one of the first to use descriptive markup;
  • Scribe is part of the history of free software, not because it was free, but because it was maybe one of the reason that led Richard Stallman to create the FFF.

Hope that the citations are enough, it seems this software was really based on ground-breaking ideas at its time. Hervegirod (talk) 23:32, 23 February 2009 (UTC)

Borland Sprint[edit]

Borland's Sprint word processor (1987) used a markup language which was a near clone of Scribe's. Wlindley (talk) 10:20, 13 September 2009 (UTC)

Further information on MINCE, FinalWord, and Scribble (Mark of the Unicorn's CP/M version of Scribe) are at [1] and [2]. MINCE and Scribble were rewritten as part of PerfectWriter, see [3] and a USENET-posted review circa 1983: [4] Wlindley (talk) 13:49, 12 April 2010 (UTC)

Where was it, where is it?[edit]

I'm not asking a Socratic (much less rhetorical) question here, but: Why is this article in the past tense?, whereas the article on TECO is in the present tense, and so is Hypercard's (mostly). I'm absolutely not saying that the TECO and Hypercard articles should be put into the past tense; but I'm curious about what has put Script entirely into the past tense, compared to them. Or maybe a better (if almost orthogonal) question is: what is the ultimate fate of Scribe, as far as current commercial availability, user support, legacy use somewhere or other, etc.? ...even just specification as a file format? Compare: the article "OS/2"’s section on legacy use. In this article, there's mention of a time bomb in Scribe, but that seems to be about registering your free copy-- it's not about all copies of Scribe, I dunno, all just vanishing into thin air on 1999/01/01 or something. (I've tried lots of googling but, uh, let's say that many many many people have products called "Scribe"!) —Sburke (talk) 10:59, 25 September 2013 (UTC)