Talk:Skill

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Article Needs Broader Science Foundation[edit]

The focus of the article at present is exclusively on basic workplace job skills. If we look at skills more broadly (for example, from a KBS/AI systems or educational design standpoint), intelligence, interpersonal skills, knowledge base, drive and ethics create a more general taxonomy of skills that matches ability, both learned and genetic, to the level of difficulty of a problem or goal. This encompasses athletes, artists, musicians, soldiers, carpenters... in other words, many more fields of endeavor than simply "workplace" skills, as is presently narrowly described. For example, what neurological features contribute to genetic vs. learned skills, and how do they differ between species? A lion is a skilled killer. A virtuoso pianist can put in 10,000 hours of practice-- how do different learning models and modalities contribute to our definition of skill? And skill isn't just about work-- a skilled gamer today can be tomorrow's skilled game designer when point and click becomes matrices and vectors. Phoenixthebird (talk) 03:16, 1 July 2010 (UTC)

Article Needs Broader Arts Foundation[edit]

I share with Phoenixthebird more than a little disappointment that the Wikipedia article on 'skill' should be devoted entirely to skills that are useful to businesses (I'm not surprised the page gets vandalised!). These skills really merit only a small section in a much broader discussion. Far from enriching human life like the skills of the athletes, artists, musicians, etc., referred to above (the start of a very long list) the 'skills' mentioned in the article seem primarily concerned with exploiting people as 'human resources'. One contributor even appears to think that self-esteem is a skill!

We need to encourage contributions reflecting a more rounded view of life, and involve the skills of the arts and sports in particular (not to mention a hundred other things that happen between parenting and gardening). I expect the science of skills would also make interesting reading. Can I suggest we put up headings at the top of the article inviting people to make a start, relegating the more specialist 'business skills' section to the bottom? It may eventually be better off as a subdivision of the more general page on 'skill'. Kinsaku —Preceding undated comment added 20:01, 22 December 2010 (UTC).

Skills in profession[edit]

Hi, I added the link to a website, with literature from some authors (at the moment 8, with videos) which mention diverse skills for a professional in the software tetsing field. --Erkan Yilmaz 15:19, 28 October 2006 (UTC)

Protection against vandalism[edit]

The Skill page has been vandalised several times. Can it be protected, at least a little? --HelgeStenstrom 11:29, 27 April 2007 (UTC)

It should, I can only imagine how many middle-schoolers have tried to vandalise this article.

Lunakeet —Preceding comment was added at 23:44, 7 March 2008 (UTC)

Functional Skills 84.71.103.219 18:19, 6 June 2007 (UTC)[edit]

Functional Skills

Skills are categorised in many ways, key skills, transferable skills, academic skills, personal skills, skills for employability and more recently functional skills. The three functional skills identified by the government are English, Maths and ICT, the QCA are developing separate functional skill qualifications. They are also looking at how functional skills can be developed and assessed in other types of qualification, for example GCSEs and Diplomas. Functional skills are the skills needed to allow people in their work and everyday life as citizens, they give them the chance to study and work independently, to make sense of the world around them, and have the skills to achieve personally and contribute to their local community. What are the skills that individuals need to be able to operate in today’s society.

Functional skills have much in common with the six key skills identified by the DfES which are: 1. Application of number - maths 2. Communication - English 3. Information and communication technology – ICT

Developing functional skills are likely to involve learners in: 4. Improving own learning and performance 5. Problem solving 6. Working with others

Questions to think about How often have you used this skill? How will this skill help me to be independent? When have I used this skill in everyday life? or when might I use this skill in everyday life? In what types of career might I use the skills I have developed today? How might I develop this skill?

References:

Name of journal: Skills and Enterprise Update. Author: Department for Education and Employment Publication: No.2. (2000.)

Name of book: The Way the Skills Work Author: Stoker, Rebecca Year of publication: 2007 Place of publication: Birmingham Publisher: Random House

Name of journal: Skills Sell Author: The Learning and Skills Council Publication: No. 7 (2004)

84.71.103.219 18:19, 6 June 2007 (UTC)

a skill is something you will have for the rest of your life.[edit]

skills are knowledge earned not learned.they are not rote, they are real non-acadeimic ability to accomplish the job at hand.fine arts, useful arts one should know the difference. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.27.206.86 (talk) 00:55, 21 February 2010 (UTC)

Badly in need of rewrite[edit]

This entire article is strangely narrow in its scope, and in my opinion it would be better to have just a basic dictionary definition, than this. It needs a much broader perspective on both the term 'skill' as perceived throughout history, as well as the actual metaphysical and physical events which we considered and consider a skill, or skilled. It's very strange that there's no sub-headline on 'survival skills' as applied and perceived throughout history and today. If someone would take on them to write that section, it might be a start. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 84.215.168.82 (talk) 23:37, 16 May 2011 (UTC)


I'm just becoming acquainted with how to contribute, and agree the link to a definition will be helpful. The Wiktionary seems an obvious choice. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/skill Listing all possible skills seems rather tedious, and it might be more helpful to focus on the generalities of how skill is developed and assessed, regardless of what the specific skill might be. 4thought (talk) 00:54, 7 December 2011 (UTC)