Talk:South American Plate

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Cratons in South America[edit]

The article on Laterite soils refers to the abundance of laterites on the South American Shield, but various articles (eg, Guiana Shield, Río de la Plata) list a variety of important cratons on the South American Plate. Perhaps a future edit could list distinctly, the shield areas currently recognised in the region? Aboctok (talk) 12:39, 19 August 2012 (UTC)

Unsure of copyright status[edit]

@Lectores2021: I reverted your addition because it sounds like it might be a quote from the study you cited, which would be a copyright violation (even though it's a translation). I saved the content you added here.

The South American Plate in its northern part, subducted below the Caribbean Plate in its eastern boundary, this colliding plates created the Caribbean Island Arc. In the southern boundary of the Caribbean Plate has a dextral lateral transcurrent boundary mainly. By comparing the relative displacement with the Caribbean Plate, we found that the South American Plate moves westwards 21 mm/year faster. [1]

It's that "we" that is problematic. — Gorthian (talk) 00:03, 24 June 2016 (UTC)

@Gorthian:

First of all I want to thank you for your interest in improving the article. I think it is essential to control possible errors and your work is important.

In my opinion It is not a copyright status problem.

"The South American Plate in its northern part, subducted below the Caribbean Plate in its eastern boundary, this colliding plates created the Caribbean Island Arc." Analysis: As you can see on the map, the South American plate in its northeast is oceanic. It borders the North American Plate and Caribbean plate. On a Map Globe you can see an arch of islands (Martinique, Saint Lucia & The Grenadines) . This arch of islands shows both the edge and the subduction of the oceanic plate under the Caribbean plate. You do not need a reference to notice this, just a basic reasoning by plate tectonics theory.

"In the southern boundary of the Caribbean Plate has a dextral lateral transcurrent boundary mainly."

Analysis: southern boundary of the Caribbean Plate - north of South American plate, land area. If we look at a map of South America and the Caribbean Sea and analyze the geomorphology we can see the northern part of Trinidad and Tobago, as well as, the peninsula of Paria has shifted. (In millions of years). This change is border evidence (dextral lateral transcurrent boundary)

"Plate moves westwards 21 mm/year faster." To understand this value it is necessary to read the research cited and referenced, but it is not a copy of it. It is rather the final number given by the scientific researcher.

.Lectores2021 (talk) 04:56, 18 December 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ Deiros D (2000) Determination of Displacement Between Caribbean and South American plates in Venezuela using Global Positioning System (GPS) data. Geological Code of Venezuela.