Talk:Syllable weight

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Corrected first paragraph of "Linguistics" section.[edit]

I corrected the first paragraph of the "Linguistics" section. I have copied it below, putting the new information in bold italics.

A heavy syllable is a syllable with a branching nucleus or a branching rime.[1]; but not all such syllables are heavy in every language. A branching nucleus generally means the syllable has a long vowel or a diphthong; this type of syllable is abbreviated CVV. A syllable with a branching rime is a closed syllable, that is, one with a coda (one or more consonants at the end of the syllable); this type of syllable is abbreviated CVC. In some languages, both CVV and CVC syllables are heavy, while a syllable with a short vowel as the nucleus and no coda (a CV syllable) is a light syllable. In other languages, only CVV syllables are heavy, while CVC and CV syllables are light. In yet other languages, CVV syllables are heavy and CV syllables are light, while some CVC syllables are heavy (for instance if the coda is a sonorant) and other CVC syllables are light (for instance if the coda is an obstruent). Some languages distinguish a third type, CVVC syllables (with both a branching nucleus and a coda) and/or CVCC syllables (with a coda consisting of two or more consonants) as superheavy syllables.

Eldin raigmore (talk) 23:12, 25 September 2015 (UTC)

  1. ^ Hyman, Larry M. (2003). A Theory of Phonological Weight. Stanford: CSLI Publications. ISBN 1-57586-328-6.