Talk:The Flying Pickets

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Only you[edit]

Is it just me, or does the Flying Picket's rendition of this tune sound as though it has been augmented by a sampling synth, such as the Fairlight CMI? It may sound like "a cappella", but I'll wager that it wasn't (strictly speaking..) Paul-b4 13:00, 19 September 2007 (UTC)

It is no secret The Flying Pickets used synthasisers when recording songs in studio and used reverb and delay in their live shows. However what went through the synthasisers are sounds they have made themselves using their voices or body parts (clicks etc). No musical instruments or computer generated sounds were used so there is a case that it is a cappella, depending on your definition of the term. Mattleek12 20:22, 20 September 2007 (UTC)

I think that "a cappella" should be in quotes in this case - singing a single note or making a noise into a sampling keyboard and compiling the sampled sounds into a backing track is not in the spirit of true a capella - all of the sounds (including any impressions of musical instruments and rhythms) should really eminate from the singers directly rather than from a musical instrument which just happens to sound exactly like them. Paul-b4 10:55, 25 September 2007 (UTC)

If your interested in hearing a non-synth performance of Only You from The Flying Pickets try and get hold of a copy of their live album from 1985, their live albums are much better in my opinion, it is in their live performances that the bands true talent is on show for all to see (or hear). Reverb & Delay are still used as I said but for a cappella purists it is probably a more acceptable version and the sound is much more raw. (Mattleek12 20:45, 26 September 2007 (UTC))

What's a bread round?[edit]

The article uses this with respect to Red Stripe: "David Gittins (aka Red Stripe) - Got a bread round after leaving the band", but it's slang and should be explained. I can't figure out if it means he was on the dole or actually was in a truck delivering bread. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 136.162.66.1 (talk) 21:41, 1 October 2010 (UTC)

Merge Red Stripe (Flying Pickets) into main band article?[edit]

Seems there isn't much content in Red Stripe (Flying Pickets), at least none which couldn't be moved up to the main band article. Unless significant content is to be added soon, it is proposed that Red Stripe (Flying Pickets) redirect to The Flying Pickets. Dl2000 (talk) 02:31, 14 March 2009 (UTC)