Talk:Unitarian martyrs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Lists (Rated List-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Lists, an attempt to structure and organize all list pages on Wikipedia. If you wish to help, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Christianity / Unitarian Universalism (Rated List-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Christianity, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Christianity on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Unitarian Universalism work group.
 

How about James Reeb?--KEVP

A couple more names from a discussion on the Unitarian Universalist Historical Society mailing list:

Viola Liuzzo

Toribio Quimada (minister in the Philippines, murdered in 1988)

Katherine (sometimes spelt Catherine) Vogel, Polish woman burnt at the stake in the sixteenth century

--KEVP —Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.215.231.138 (talk) 13:36, 6 April 2009 (UTC)


This article is turning into an incoherent mish-mash. It opens by stating that "Unitarian martyrs are Bible-believing Christians who were willing to die for their belief in Unitarianism, one God, one person (the Father). Early Christians were persecuted because they believed that Jesus was the Son of God; Unitarian martyrs were persecuted because they did not support the ecumenical view of the Trinity."

I doubt that Viola Liuzzo, the Rev. James Reeb, the Rev. Norbert Capek, and the Rev. Toribio Quimada qualify as "Unitarian martyrs" thus defined.

Viola Liuzzo and the Rev. James Reeb were murdered in 1965 because they supported civil rights for African Americans, not on account of any failure to "support the ecumenical view of the Trinity."

I suspect that Dr. Norbert Capek's death at the hands of the Nazis also had relatively little do with the Nazis' desire to enforce Trinitarian doctrine.

Neither did the assassination of the Rev. Toribio Quimada, in a conflict between the Philippine government and paramilitary, on the one hand, and Communist insurgents, on the other, have much (if anything) to do with anyone's attempts to enforce Trinitarian orthodoxy.

Eric Alan Isaacson (talk) 23:21, 21 December 2009 (UTC)

addressing the modern usage of the term Unitarian[edit]

To address the modern usage of the term Unitarian by some Unitarian and Unitarian Universalist religious organizations I have added the following to the introduction:

"And in modern times as the Unitarian moment broadened to embrace more then simply Christianity, Unitarian martyrs may rightly now also included, individuals who died for their adherence to Liberal religion."

This may not be perfect, but I feel it is a big improvement. --Devin Murphy (talk) 22:08, 22 May 2013 (UTC)