Talk:Xin (concept)

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It's wonderful that citations are provided in the second paragraph above, but without including the character or glyph for xin, it's difficult to ascertain if the same concept is being compared between Taoist & Confucianist thought. The ability to put trust (i.e. 信 xìn) or to have faith in the fact that others will act with propriety, sounds more like what is suggested when speaking of one's socialization, as opposed to the concept of their emotional stability (i.e. 心 xīn) playing some role in becoming a useful citizen by developing virtuous tendencies (i.e. 德 dé) as a result of said emotional stability. Is it possible that Zhuangzi was referring to xin 信 (i.e. trust) instead of xin 心 (i.e. heart/mind)? Clearly the Confucian view must mean xin 心, as only by cultivating one's thoughts can you become virtuous. But how do your own thoughts betray your "personal nature"? It seems more likely that xin 德 is the detriment feared by Zhuangzi, since putting blind faith in the virtue of others could lead to disaster. In other words, it would be better to follow your instincts and be distrustful of others, than to get metaphorically 'stabbed in the back' should people you interact with yield to greed or avarice instead of playing by the same rules of society as yourself. — Originally included in main article by 186.32.185.5 (talk) 19:55, 19 July 2013 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 198.53.57.34 (talk)