Talk:Yggdrasil Linux/GNU/X

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"Plug and Play"[edit]

The main article doesn't make clear that "Plug and Play" meant that the Yggdrasil was designed to analyze your hardware and come up with a complete running Linux system, as Knoppix, Mandrake Move, et al do today. Yggdrasil was even more sophisticated than these recent systems as it allowed you to either (1) log in and use the system, (2) log in as "demo" and get a great automated demo, or (3) login as "install" and have the install process make use of a fully functional Linux system, rather than the usual severely cut down install O/S in modern distributions. Yggdrasil was very far ahead of its time. Jgd 05:33, 8 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Yggdrasil today[edit]

What was kind of strange to me is that I ran across their website a few years ago, and they were still advertising their 1995 release. It was just so bizzare. I'm thinking we can safely remove the mention of anyone still wanting to use Yggdrasil these days, because there are other small linux distributions intended to run on low-memory / low-storage systems.

Yggdrasil in its time[edit]

People today shouldn't be dismissive of Yggdrasil. In its time, it was important. I started playing with Linux in 1994 and I had been out of college for over ten years. Those still in college had healthy support networks to answer their dumb newbie questions. Those of us trying to figure it out on our own were lucky to have Yggdrasil. I was very impressed that Adam Richter would often answer the support line himself, and he was very very good at getting me through dumb newbie problems. I never met him in person but I do feel indebted to him for helping me get up the learning curve. - WillWare 22:34, 2 April 2006 (UTC)

links[edit]

Removing useful links doesn't look like a good way to improve an article to me... NerdyNSK 23:19, 14 October 2007 (UTC)

This is an encyclopedia article, not a "collection of useful links". The article on the domestic rabbit doesn't include any maps to pet shops. Chris Cunningham 11:56, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

pronounciation ref[edit]

Could someone explain me who in their right mind would delete the pronunciation reference? NerdyNSK 23:28, 14 October 2007 (UTC)

The one which pointed to the LinuxQuestions wiki? I could have edited that page myself to say that it was pronounced "Mangrove Throat-Warbler" if I'd wanted. Not a reliable source by any stretch of the imagination. Chris Cunningham 11:56, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

Move to San Jose misdated[edit]

Yggdrasil was located in San Jose at least since late 1994; I worked for them briefly in 1995. Hpa (talk) 01:38, 29 November 2007 (UTC)

Portal:Free software: Yggdrasil is now the selected article[edit]

Just to let you know. The purpose of selecting an article is both to point readers to the article and to highlight it to potential contributors. It will remain on the portal for a week or so. The previous selected article was GNU wget - the command line http client.

For other interesting free software articles, you can take a look at the archive of PF's selectees. --Gronky (talk) 14:29, 16 January 2008 (UTC)

Things moved on and Cygwin is now the selected article. Cygwin is software to make a Windows box act as GNU-ish and Unix-ish as possible and to make free software applications available to users of MS Windows. --Gronky (talk) 09:46, 30 January 2008 (UTC)