Template:Infobox 2011–2012 Saudi Arabian protests

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2011–2012 Saudi Arabian protests
Part of Qatif conflict and the Arab Spring
Saudi Arabia (orthographic projection).svg
Date 11 March 2011 – 24 December 2012
(1 year, 11 months and 3 days)
Location Saudi Arabia
24°39′00″N 46°46′01″E / 24.65°N 46.767°E / 24.65; 46.767Coordinates: 24°39′00″N 46°46′01″E / 24.65°N 46.767°E / 24.65; 46.767
Caused by
Goals
Methods
Concessions
given
Parties to the civil conflict
Lead figures

Saudi Arabia Human Rights Defenders

Saudi Arabia Independent Opposition leaders

Saudi Arabia King Abdullah
King of Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia Prince Salman
Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia Prince Nayef
Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia (until June 2012)

Saudi Arabia Prince Muhammad
Interior Minister
Number
Protesters: Thousands[28][29]
Online campaign: 26,000[30]
Casualties
Deaths: 17 identified
Injuries: 100+[31]
Arrests: Riyadh: 50;[32][33][34] East Province: 145[17]
Deaths: 1 identified
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References[edit]

  1. ^ Laessing, Ulf; Alsharif, Asma (5 February 2011). "Saudi women protest, web activists call for reform". Swiss Info. Reuters. Archived from the original on 16 February 2011. Retrieved 16 February 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Voters register for Saudi municipal elections". Al Jazeera. 23 April 2011. Archived from the original on 25 April 2011. Retrieved 25 April 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c al-Huwaider, Wajeha (23 May 2011). "The Saudi woman who took to the driver's seat". France 24. Archived from the original on 23 May 2011. Retrieved 2011-05-23. 
  4. ^ "Corruption in Saudi Arabia's Government reaches All Time Highs". Islam Times. 1 December 2009. Retrieved 2012-07-14. 
  5. ^ Kawach, Nadim (17 April 2011). "Saudi public sector hit by corruption". Emirates 24/7. Archived from the original on 14 July 2012. Retrieved 2012-07-14. 
  6. ^ "Saudi protests against unemployment". Al-Ahram. Reuters. 9 January 2011. Archived from the original on 14 July 2012. Retrieved 2012-07-14. 
  7. ^ Alsharif, Asma; Jason Benham (10 April 2011). "Saudi unemployed graduates protest to demand jobs". Reuters. Archived from the original on 14 July 2012. Retrieved 2012-07-14. 
  8. ^ al-Alawi, Irfan (1 April 2011). "Saudi Arabia's anti-protest fatwa is transparent". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2 April 2011. Retrieved 2 April 2011. 
  9. ^ Jansen, Michael (19 March 2011). "Saudi king announces huge spending to stem dissent". The Irish Times. Retrieved 3 April 2011. 
  10. ^ al-Saeri, Muqbil (March 2011). "A talk with Peninsula Shield force commander Mutlaq Bin Salem al-Azima". Asharq al-Awsat. Archived from the original on 29 March 2011. Retrieved 29 March 2011. 
  11. ^ "Saudi Shi'ites protest, support Bahrain brethren". Reuters. 16 March 2011. Archived from the original on 17 March 2011. Retrieved 17 March 2011. 
  12. ^ Benham, Jason (25 March 2011). "Hundreds of Saudi Shi'ites protest in east". Reuters. Archived from the original on 25 March 2011. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  13. ^ "Al-Nimr's death sentence triggers protest". yementimes.com. 
  14. ^ Cockburn, Patrick (5 October 2011). "Saudi Police open fire on civilians". The Independent. Archived from the original on 15 January 2012. Retrieved 2012-01-15. 
  15. ^ "Two die during Saudi Arabia protest at Shia cleric arrest". 9 July 2012 – via www.bbc.co.uk. 
  16. ^ "Saudis begin nationwide mosque sit-in". Press TV. 23 December 2011. Archived from the original on 17 January 2012. Retrieved 2012-01-18. 
  17. ^ a b "Saudi Arabia: Arrests for Peaceful Protest on the Rise". Human Rights Watch. 27 March 2011. Archived from the original on 31 March 2011. Retrieved 31 March 2011. 
  18. ^ al-Suhaimy, Abeed (23 March 2011). "Saudi Arabia announces municipal elections". Asharq al-Awsat. Archived from the original on 2 April 2011. Retrieved 2 April 2011. 
  19. ^ Abu-Nasr, Donna (28 March 2011). "Saudi Women Inspired by Fall of Mubarak Step Up Equality Demand". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 2 April 2011. Retrieved 2 April 2011. 
  20. ^ "Saudis vote in municipal elections, results on Sunday". Oman Observer. AFP. 30 September 2011. Archived from the original on 14 December 2011. Retrieved 2011-12-14. 
  21. ^ Alsharif, Asma (8 August 2012). "Saudi authorities crack down on rights campaigners: activists". Reuters. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-14. 
  22. ^ Ottaway, David B. (3 August 2012). "Saudi Arabia's Race Against Time" (PDF). Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-14. 
  23. ^ Rosie Bsheer (7 May 2012). "Saudi Revolutionaries: An Interview". Jadaliyya. Retrieved 12 November 2012. 
  24. ^ "Saudi-Arabiens Mächtige werden nervös". Handelsblatt (in German). DPA. 2 March 2011. Archived from the original on 5 March 2011. Retrieved 3 March 2011. 
  25. ^ "Report: Saudi Facebook activist planning protest shot dead". Monsters and Critics. DPA. 2 March 2011. Archived from the original on 2 March 2011. Retrieved 2 March 2011. 
  26. ^ Bustamante, Tom (2 March 2011). "Iraq Oil Refinery Attack Shows Need for EarthSearch (ECDC) Systems". Wall Street Newscast. Archived from the original on 2 March 2011. Retrieved 2 March 2011. 
  27. ^ Matthiesen, Toby (23 January 2012). "Saudi Arabia: the Middle East's most under-reported conflict". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 23 January 2012. Retrieved 2012-01-23. 
  28. ^ "Several injured in Saudi Arabia protest". Press TV. March 2011. Archived from the original on 18 March 2011. Retrieved 18 March 2011. 
  29. ^ "Kuwait Navy set for Bahrain - Saudi Shias Rally". Arab Times. 18 March 2011. Archived from the original on 19 March 2011. Retrieved 19 March 2011. 
  30. ^ E, Sara (6 March 2011). "Saudi Facebook Administrator Faisal Ahmed Abdul-Ahadwas reportedly shot as Saudi Arabia bans protests ahead of its Day of Rage". EU-digest. Archived from the original on 9 March 2011. Retrieved 9 March 2011. 
  31. ^ "Saudi police wound 3 Shiite protesters: witness". France 24. AFP. 10 March 2011. Archived from the original on 10 March 2011. Retrieved 10 March 2011. 
  32. ^ "Saudi police break up protest outside Riyadh interior ministry". International Business Times. 21 March 2011. Archived from the original on 21 March 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  33. ^ Chulov, Martin (21 March 2011). "Egyptians endorse reforms but Arab discontent simmers". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 21 March 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  34. ^ "Women remain barred from voting as Saudi Arabia announces elections". The National. AP/Bloomberg. 23 March 2011. Archived from the original on 22 March 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011.