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Texas Park Road 3

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Park Road 3 marker

Park Road 3
Route information
Maintained by TxDOT
Length: 1.160 mi[1] (1.867 km)
Existed: September 26, 1939[1] – present
Major junctions
East end: SH 118 in Davis Mountains State Park
West end: Indian Lodge in Davis Mountains State Park
Location
Counties: Jeff Davis
Highway system
FM 3 RE 3

Park Road 3 (PR 3) is a 1.2-mile (1.9 km) Park Road located near Fort Davis, in the U.S. state of Texas. The highway connects the Indian Lodge of Davis Mountains State Park to State Highway 118 (SH 118). The entire length of the road is located within the park. The highway was constructed in 1933 by the Civilian Conservation Corps.

The highway currently has one suffixed route, Park Road 3A, also known as Skyline Drive. This route is 2.8 miles (4.5 km) long, which is longer than its parent route. This road was created in 1965.

Route description[edit]

PR 3's 1.2-mile (1.9 km)[1] main road begins at SH 118. Immediately after the intersection, PR 3 divides into two one-way roadways separated by the park headquarters and reuniting just beyond.[2] The road then continues westward through Keesey Canyon one-half mile (0.8 km) passing a couple of small hiking trails to the intersection with PR 3A. Beyond PR 3A, several drives branch off as loops accessing campsites, staff residences, and other park facilities. The road makes a sharp curve and a steep upward grade before ending at Indian Lodge 1.2-mile (1.9 km) west of the intersection with PR 3A.[2][3]

History[edit]

In 1924, the Texas Legislature directed the State Parks Board, a predecessor agency to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, to consider establishing a major destination park within the Davis Mountains. After the parks board failed to receive appropriations or donated land for a new park, the Legislature then instructed the State Highway Department, which preceded the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), to build a Davis Mountains State Park Highway in 1927. Landowners finally agreed to donate land for the park in 1933 to boost the local economy devastated by the Great Depression. With the creation of the park, a state park highway was no longer necessary, and that highway initially became SH 166.[4]

Construction of PR 3 began in 1933 soon after the establishment of the state park. Like the park, the road was originally constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps.[5] The road at this time consisted of the main route between the park entrance and Indian Lodge.

In 1939, SH 118 was extended from Fort Davis to Kent over the portion of SH 166 at the terminus of PR 3.[6] The state ended the SH 166 designation over that same portion in 1941.[7]

PR 3 in Davis Mountains State Park

Major intersections[edit]

The entire highway is in the Davis Mountains State Park, Jeff Davis County.

mi[8] km Destinations Notes
1.160 1.867 SH 118 – Fort Davis, Kent Eastern terminus
0.723 1.164 PR 3A (Skyline Drive)
0.000 0.000 Indian Lodge Western terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Park Road 3A[edit]

Park Road 3A
Location: Davis Mountains State Park
Length: 2.529 mi[8] (4.070 km)
Existed: 1965–present
Marker for PR 3A

Park Road 3A (PR 3A) known as Skyline Drive is a 2.8-mile-long (4.5 km) suffixed spur of PR 3. The road travels from a junction with PR 3 to the border of the state park, and provides access to a trail leading to Fort Davis National Historic Site.[2]

The road begins at PR 3 and crosses Keesey Creek before turning east in Keesey Canyon. Like PR 3, the road also has connecting drives acting as loops and cul-de-sacs to campgrounds and park facilities. After leaving the campground, the road begins steeply ascending the ridge between Keesey and Hospital canyons on a climb requiring several switchbacks.[9] The road connects with drives to scenic overlooks, picnic tables, and trail heads before terminating after 2.8 miles (4.5 km) at a scenic overlook and trail head at the boundary between the park and Fort Davis National Historic Site.[2][3]

Park Road 3A was first created by the CCC in 1933, when the state park was built.[5] In 1965, the Texas Department of Transportation numbered the route Park Road 3A.[1]

Major junctions

The entire highway is in the Davis Mountains State Park, Jeff Davis County.

mi[8] km Destinations Notes
0.000 0.000 PR 3 Western terminus
2.387 3.842 Access to Skyline Drive Trail
2.529 4.070 Cul-de-sac; hiking trail to Fort Davis National Historic Site Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Park Road No. 3". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 13, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d Davis Mountains State Park (PDF) (Map) (2009 ed.). Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 2009. Retrieved December 22, 2009. 
  3. ^ a b Google (June 5, 2012). "Route of Park Road 3" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved June 5, 2012. 
  4. ^ Staff. "Davis Mountains State Park". The Look of Nature: Designing Texas State Parks During the Great Depression. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved December 22, 2009. 
  5. ^ a b Klepper, E. Dan (October 2006). "Sky Island". Texas Parks & Wildlife. Austin, TX: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 64 (10). ISSN 0040-4586. Retrieved December 14, 2009. 
  6. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 118". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 12, 2009. 
  7. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 166". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 12, 2009. 
  8. ^ a b c Statewide Planning Map (Map). Cartography by Transportation Planning and Programming Division. Texas Department of Transportation. 2012. Retrieved November 12, 2012. 
  9. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2014). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2014 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 42. Retrieved December 1, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

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