Tom Osborne (Canadian politician)

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Tom Osborne

Speaker of the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly
In office
December 14, 2015[1] – July 31, 2017
PremierDwight Ball
Lieutenant GovernorFrank Fagan
Preceded byWade Verge
Succeeded byPerry Trimper
Member of the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly
for Waterford Valley
St. John's South (1996-2015)
Assumed office
February 22, 1996
Preceded byTom Murphy
Minister of Environment and Conservation Newfoundland and Labrador
In office
2003–2006
Succeeded byClyde Jackman
Minister of Health and Community Services Newfoundland and Labrador
In office
2006–2007
Preceded byJohn Ottenheimer
Succeeded byRoss Wiseman
Minister of Justice and Attorney General Newfoundland and Labrador
In office
2007–2007
Preceded byPaul Shelley
Succeeded byJerome Kennedy
Personal details
BornSt. John's, Newfoundland
Political partyLiberal (2013-present)
Independent (2012-2013)
Progressive Conservatives (1996-2012)
Twitter@TomOsbornePC

Tom Osborne (born 1964), is a politician in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. He represents the district of Waterford Valley in the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly. He is a member of the Liberal Party, a former member of the Progressive Conservative Party, and a former Minister in Danny Williams' first cabinet.[2] He is currently Minister of Finance in the Ball government.

Osborne is currently the province's longest consecutively-serving MHA having been in the House of Assembly since 1996.

Politics[edit]

Opposition[edit]

Osborne was first elected to the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly in the 1996 provincial election in the district of St. John's South. The election resulted in a landslide victory for Brian Tobin's Liberals and Osborne was one of only nine Progressive Conservative elected. Osborne was re-elected in the 1999 election and though the PC's had gained 5 seats the Liberals still won a large majority government.

In government[edit]

With the victory of the Progressive Conservatives in the 2003 election Premier Danny Williams appointed Osborne to Cabinet as the Minister responsible for Environment and Labour. On February 20, 2004 Government announced a restructuring of departments, which saw the creation of the new Department of Environment and Conservation, which Osborne remained minister of.

On March 14, 2006, Osborne became Minister of Health and Community Services succeeding John Ottenheimer. During his time as Minister of Health more information on errors in hormone receptor breast cancer testing were coming to light. The errors eventually led to the Commission of Inquiry on Hormone Receptor Testing.

In January 2007, with the announcement that several cabinet Ministers would not be seeking re-election in that October's general election Williams shuffled his Cabinet. Osborne was assigned the Justice portfolio taking over for Paul Shelley who was retiring from politics in October.[3]

With the re-election of the Progressive Conservatives in 2007, Osborne was replaced as Justice Minister by Jerome Kennedy. Williams announced he would be nominating Osborne to serve as Deputy Chair of Committees in the House of Assembly and On November 1, 2007, he was confirmed to serve as Deputy Chair of Committees in the House of Assembly.[4]

In 2008, Osborne testified at the Commission of Inquiry on Hormone Receptor Testing and was asked about his time as Minister of Health.[5]

Opposition[edit]

In September 2012, Osborne resigned from the Progressive Conservative party citing the leadership of Premier Kathy Dunderdale and began sitting as an Independent.[6] On August 29, 2013, Osborne joined the Liberal Party of Newfoundland and Labrador.[7]

Ball government (2015-present)[edit]

In the 2015 election the Liberal Party won control of the House of Assembly and Osborne was chosen as Speaker. Following the resignation of Cathy Bennett, Osborne was appointed Minister of Finance in the Ball government on July 31, 2017.

Electoral record[edit]

Waterford Valley - Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2015
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Tom Osborne 3,588 65.9%
     NDP Alison Coffin 1,062 19.5%
Progressive Conservative Alison Stoodley 792 14.6%
St. John's South - Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 2,966 57.90%
     NDP Keith Dunne 1,994 38.92%
Liberal Trevor Hickey 163 3.18%
St. John's South - Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2007
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 3887 79.6%
     NDP Clyde Bridger 571 11.69%
Liberal Rex Gibbons 425 8.7%

[8]

St. John's South - Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 4,532
Liberal Dennis O'Keefe* 756
     NDP Tom McGinnis 676

[9]

  • Dennis O'Keefe who ran as the Liberal candidate is not the same Dennis O'Keefe that is currently Mayor of St. John's.
St. John's South - Newfoundland general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 4,041 66.32%
Liberal Patrick Kennedy 1563 25.65%
     NDP Judy Vanata 374 6.14%
     Independent Jason Crummey 101 1.66%

[10]

St. John's South - Newfoundland general election, 1996
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Tom Osborne 2,521 42.17%
Liberal Tom Murphy 2,417 40.43%
     NDP Sue Skipton 858 14.35%
     Independent Bill Maddigan 155 2.59%

[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/new-house-speaker-tom-osborne-first-to-be-chosen-by-election-1.3372475
  2. ^ "Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly Member Profile". Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly. Retrieved 2008-11-20.
  3. ^ "Williams shuffles cabinet heading into N.L. election stretch". CBC News. January 19, 2007. Retrieved April 7, 2014.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-08-11. Retrieved 2011-04-16.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "No regrets over how cancer case was handled, former minister says". CBC News. April 8, 2008. Retrieved April 7, 2014.
  6. ^ "Osborne quits Tories, cites Dunderdale leadership". CBC News. September 13, 2012. Retrieved April 29, 2018.
  7. ^ "Tom Osborne joins Liberals". CBC News. August 29, 2013. Retrieved April 29, 2018.
  8. ^ Newfoundland & Labrador Votes 2007. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved May 22, 2009.
  9. ^ Newfoundland & Labrador Votes 2003. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved May 22, 2009.
  10. ^ a b General Election Reports Archived 2011-07-06 at the Wayback Machine. Elections Newfoundland & Labrador. Retrieved April 6, 2011.

External links[edit]