Tony Jun Huang

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Tony Jun Huang
Prof. Tony Jun Huang.jpg
Professor Huang in 2014
ResidenceUnited States
Scientific career
Fields
InstitutionsDuke University
Website

Tony Jun Huang is the William Bevan Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke University. He is an expert in the fields of acoustofluidics, optofluidics, and micro/nano systems for biomedical diagnostics and therapeutics. [1][2] [3][4] [5] [6] [7] [8][9] [10] He is widely recognized for his breakthroughs in developing acoustic tweezer technologies to trap and manipulate individual cells [11] [12] [13] and to control microorganisms. [14] [15] [16] [17] [18]

Prior to joining Duke, he was the Huck Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering Science and Mechanics at Penn State.[19] He received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from the UCLA, and earned undergraduate and master's degrees at Xi'an Jiaotong University.

He has authored/co-authored over 190 peer-reviewed journal publications in these fields.[20] His journal articles have been cited more than 13,000 times, as documented at Google Scholar (h-index: 62). He also has 20 patents and invention disclosures. He was elected a fellow of the following five professional societies: the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE),[21] the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME),[22] the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE),[23][24] the Institute of Physics (IOP),[25] and the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Huang’s research has gained international recognition through numerous prestigious awards and honors including a 2010 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s New Innovator Award, a 2011 Penn State Engineering Alumni Society Outstanding Research Award, 2011&2013&2016 JALA Top Ten Breakthroughs of the Year Award, a 2012 Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award from the Society for Manufacturing Engineering, a 2013 Faculty Scholar Medal from The Pennsylvania State University, a 2013 American Asthma Foundation (AAF) Scholar Award, the 2014 IEEE Sensors Council Technical Achievement Award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the 2017 Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award from the American Chemical Society (ACS).[26][27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sound waves create whirlpools to round up tiny signs of disease". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  2. ^ "Acoustic tweezers move cells in three dimensions, build structures". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  3. ^ "A cheap, disposable device for diagnosing disease". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  4. ^ "A fast cell sorter shrinks to cellphone size". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  5. ^ "On-chip Processor: first step in point-of-care asthma and tuberculosis diagnostics". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  6. ^ "Sound Waves Gently Cull Circulating Tumor Cells from Blood Samples". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  7. ^ "Using sound to separate cancer cells from blood samples". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  8. ^ "Sound separates cancer cells from blood samples". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  9. ^ "Acoustic tweezers device expands the range of x-ray crystallography". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  10. ^ "Cost-effective, high-performance micropumps for lab-on-a-chip disease diagnosis". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  11. ^ "Acoustic tweezers manipulate cell-to-cell contact". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  12. ^ "Acoustic Tweezers: Touchless Trapping and Manipulation". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  13. ^ "Sorting cells with sound waves". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  14. ^ "Acoustic Tweezers Capture Tiny Creatures With Ultrasound". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  15. ^ "Microfluidic devices gently rotate small organisms and cells". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  16. ^ "Gently rotating small organisms in a microfluidic device". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  17. ^ "Acoustic Cell-sorting Chip May Lead to Cell Phone-sized Medical Labs". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  18. ^ "Acoustic Tweezers Can Position Tiny Objects". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  19. ^ "Tony Huang". duke.edu. Retrieved May 2, 2017.
  20. ^ "AIMBE Fellows Directory". Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  21. ^ "AIMBE Fellows Directory". Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  22. ^ "List of all ASME fellows" (PDF). ASME Fellows Directory.
  23. ^ "IEEE fellow". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  24. ^ "2016 elevated fellow" (PDF). Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  25. ^ "IOP fellow". Retrieved August 3, 2017.
  26. ^ "Duke Acoustofluidics Lab". Retrieved May 16, 2017.
  27. ^ "2017 Young Innovator Award". Retrieved August 3, 2017.