Triumph Street Triple

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Triumph Street Triple
Triumph Street Triple 675 front left threequarter.jpg
Manufacturer Triumph
Class Streetfighter
Engine 674.8 cc (41.18 cu in) liquid-cooled DOHC inline-3
Bore / stroke 74.0 mm × 52.3 mm (2.91 in × 2.06 in)
Compression ratio 12.65:1
Power 68.1 kW (91.3 hp) @ 11,750 rpm[1]
Torque 60.2 N·m (44.4 ft·lb) @ 8250 rpm[1]
Rake, trail 24.3°, 95.3 mm (3.75 in)
Wheelbase 1,395 mm (54.9 in)
Dimensions L: 2,030 mm (80 in)
W: 736 mm (29.0 in)
H: 1,250 mm (49 in)
Seat height 800 mm (31 in)
Fuel capacity 17.4 l (3.8 imp gal; 4.6 US gal)
Related Triumph Daytona 675

The Triumph Street Triple is a naked or streetfighter motorcycle made by Triumph Motorcycles, first released towards the end of 2007.[2] The bike is closely modelled on the Speed Triple 1050 but uses a re-tuned inline three cylinder 675 cc engine from the Daytona 675 sport bike, which was released in 2006.[2][3]

History[edit]

First generation Street Triple
2014 Street Triple R with slanted headlights and low-mounted exhaust

In 2007, a number of spy photos and speculative design drawings were reported in the motorcycle press,[4] with one magazine capturing a road test of the completed Street Triple.[5] Later articles reported on leaked design shots of the new bike.[6] A report on the showcasing of the finished bike to dealers was published on 6 March 2007, along with a spy video of a test ride.[7]

The Street Triple R shares the same engine and chassis as the standard model but has fully adjustable suspension both front and rear which is shared with the Daytona. The revised rear suspension results in a slightly higher seat height over the standard model and sharper rake. It has other minor equipment differences over the standard bike in the way of handlebars, brakes, and different colour schemes.

In 2010, Triumph launched the Tiger 800 and Tiger 800 XC, which use a longer stroke version of the Street Triple engine.[8]

The Street Triple's circular headlights were changed to an angular shape for the 2012 model year. In 2013, Triumph remodeled the frame, making the bike both lighter and more agile. The engine remained unchanged while the 1st gear was made considerably taller by taking the gear ratios from the Daytona 675. Total mass was reduced by 6 kg. A new exhaust mounted underneath the engine replaced the underseat exhaust from the previous version, moving the centre of mass forwards and down. .[9] In February 2015 Triumph released a new Street Triple Rx, with the angular seat unit from the Daytona 675, a quick-shifter and different colors (where the rims are red in any color scheme).[10]

In January 2017, Triumph announced they would replace the 675 cc Street Triple with a new range of 765 cc (46.7 cu in) Street Triples. Despite having a capacity increase of 90 cc (5.5 cu in), the new models weigh slightly less than the outgoing 675 cc bike, and the engine casings are just as compact. The three models in the range are the base model S, intermediate R, and highest specification RS. As well as having different levels of equipment, such as brakes, suspension, and a quick shifter, the three models have different power outputs: 113 hp (84 kW) for the S, 118 hp (88 kW) for the R, and 123 hp (92 kW) for the RS. For the UK's A2 learner's license, a 660 cc (40 cu in) version of the R will also be sold.[11][12]

Specification[edit]

Year 2007–2012
Street Triple
2009–2012
Street Triple R
2013–2016
Street Triple
2013–2016
Street Triple R
Engine 674.8 cc (41.18 cu in) transverse inline-3, DOHC, 4V/cyl, liquid cooled
Bore × stroke 74 mm × 52.3 mm (2.91 in × 2.06 in)
Fuel system Keihin EFI Multipoint sequential EFI SAI
Compression ratio 12.65:1
Crankshaft
horsepower (claimed)
80 kW (107 bhp) @ 11,700 rpm[13][dead link] 78 kW (105 bhp) @ 11,700 rpm[14][dead link]
Crankshaft
torque (claimed)
69.1 N·m (51.0 lbf·ft) @ 9,100 rpm[13]
Rear wheel horsepower 68.1 kW (91.3 hp) @ 11,750 rpm[1]
Rear wheel torque 60.2 N·m (44.4 ft·lb) @ 8250 rpm[1]
Transmission Multi-plate wet clutch, 6-speed
Final drive O-ring chain
Frame Aluminium beam twin-spar
Front suspension Kayaba (KYB) 41 mm telescopic fork
Front suspension
adjustment
None Preload, compression, and rebound None Preload, compression, and rebound
Front fork
travel
120 mm (4.7 in) 115 mm (4.5 in)
Rear suspension Kayaba monoshock
Rear adjustment Preload Preload, compression, and rebound
Rear travel 126 mm (5.0 in) 130 mm (5.1 in) 126 mm (5.0 in) 135 mm (5.3 in)
Brakes, front Dual 308 mm discs Dual Nissin 308 mm discs Dual Nissin 310 mm discs, ABS
Brakes, rear 220 mm disc Nissin 220 disc Brembo 220 mm disc, ABS
Wheels Front: 3.5x17in
Rear: 5.5x17in
Tires Front: 120/70 ZR 17
Rear: 180/55 ZR 17
Fuel capacity 17.4 l (3.8 imp gal; 4.6 US gal)
Height (w/o mirrors) 1,060 mm (42 in) 1,110 mm (44 in) 1,060 mm (42 in) 1,110 mm (44 in)
Wet weight 182 kg (401 lb)
Width 735 mm (28.9 in) 2009–2010: 735 mm (28.9 in)
2011–2012: 755 mm (29.7 in)
735 mm (28.9 in) 740 mm (29 in)
Length 2,000 mm (79 in) 2,030 mm (80 in) 2,000 mm (79 in) 2,055 mm (80.9 in)
Wheelbase 2007–2009: 1,394.5 mm (54.90 in)
2010: 1,390 mm (55 in)
2011–2012: 1,410 mm (56 in)
2009–2010: 1,394.5 mm (54.90 in)
2011–2012: 1,410 mm (56 in)
1,410 mm (56 in) 1,410 mm (56 in)
Rake, trail 24.3, 95.3 mm (3.75 in) 23.9, 92.4 mm (3.64 in) 24.1, 99.6 mm (3.92 in) 23.4, 95 mm (3.7 in)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Hearn, Alex. "1-2-3-4: single, twin, triple or four? Adding up the ultimate 650cc solution; Which middleweight is master? The BMW Xmoto, Kawasaki Versys, Triumph Street Triple and Suzuki GSX650F meet on the street to find out." Motorcyclist Apr. 2008: 76+. General OneFile. Web. 13 Jan. 2015.
  2. ^ a b Cycleworld 2008 Triumph Street Triple 675 Sneak Peek
  3. ^ motorcycledaily.com on Triumph Press Release Street Triple 675
  4. ^ superbike.co.uk Triumph speed triple
  5. ^ MCN Spy Picture of speed triple
  6. ^ visordown.com leaked picture of Triumph Street Triple 675 pic
  7. ^ MCN Triumph Naked 675 Confirmed
  8. ^ "Triumph Tiger 800 launch: Simon Warburton". Visor Down. 7 November 2010. Retrieved 23 November 2010. 
  9. ^ Cope, Ben (11 May 2012), "2013 Triumph Street Triple R review", Visor Down 
  10. ^ Street Triple Rx, Triumph, 30 September 2014 
  11. ^ "Triumph Street Triple 765 range revealed; Triumph's new Street Triple range is here", Visor Down, 1 January 2017 
  12. ^ Newland, Richard (11 January 2017), "Triumph unveil new Street Triple 765 RS", Motorcycle News 
  13. ^ a b http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/2007/triumph/street/specifications/05/performance.html
  14. ^ http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/2012/triumph/street/triple/specifications/84684/05/performance.html

External links[edit]