Tyrrell 001

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Tyrrell 001
Tyrrell 001 Goodwood 2008.jpg
The Tyrrell 001 driven by Jackie Stewart at the 2008 Goodwood Festival Of Speed.
CategoryFormula One
ConstructorTyrrell Racing Organisation
Designer(s)Derek Gardner
Successor002
Technical specifications
ChassisAluminium monocoque
Suspension (front)Double wishbones, coil springs
Suspension (rear)Double wishbones, coil springs
EngineFord-Cosworth DFV, 2,993 cc (182.6 cu in), 90° V8, Naturally aspirated, mid-mounted,
TransmissionHewland FG400 5-speed manual
FuelElf
TyresDunlop (1970)
Goodyear (1971)
Competition history
Notable entrantsElf Team Tyrrell
Notable driversUnited Kingdom Jackie Stewart
United States Peter Revson
Debut1970 Canadian Grand Prix
RacesWinsPolesF.Laps
5020
Constructors' Championships1 (1971)
Drivers' Championships1 (1971)
n.b. Unless otherwise stated, all data refer to
Formula One World Championship Grands Prix only.

The Tyrrell 001 is a Formula One racing car which was designed for the end of the 1970 and the beginning of the 1971 Formula One season by Tyrrell Racing's Chief Designer, Derek Gardner. The car competed in five Grands Prix retiring on four occasions and achieving one second-place finish.

Racing history[edit]

The cockpit of the Tyrrell 001.

When Ken Tyrrell, the team's owner, became disenchanted with the poor performance of March chassis during the 1970 season, he decided he would design and build his own car. He employed Derek Gardner to design it in secret at his own house.[1] The project, codenamed "SP" which meant "Special Project" cost Tyrrell over £22,000 of his own money. The resulting car made its debut at Oulton Park at a non-championship race but retired; the car was introduced too late in the season to make any difference in the championship; it competed in the final 3 rounds of the season in North America. Jackie Stewart took pole in the Canadian Grand Prix but retired with axle failure while leading,[2][3] Stewart led again in the United States Grand Prix when the car suffered an oil leak.[4][2] The Mexican Grand Prix was delayed due to the large crowd of 200,000 proving difficult to control, almost forcing the cancellation of the race. They were crammed in front of the guard-rails, sat at the trackside and ran across the track itself. Despite impassioned appeals from Stewart and local hero Pedro Rodríguez they still remained troublesome. Stewart had suspension failure caused by running over a dog.[5][2] Stewart took pole in the South African Grand Prix but finished 2nd to Mario Andretti's Ferrari,[6][2] Stewart raced the Tyrrell 003 for the reminder of the season. Peter Revson drove the 001's final race in the United States Grand Prix but retired with clutch failure.[7][8]

Tyrrell 001 at the 2008 Silverstone Classic

Complete Formula One World Championship results[edit]

(key)(results in bold indicate pole position, results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Tyres Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Points WCC
1970 Elf Team Tyrrell D RSA ESP MON BEL NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA MEX - -
United Kingdom Jackie Stewart Ret Ret Ret
1971 Elf Team Tyrrell G RSA ESP MON NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA 73 1st
United Kingdom Jackie Stewart 2
United States Peter Revson Ret

6 points were scored using the Tyrrell 001; the other 67 points were scored using the Tyrrell 002 and Tyrrell 003

References[edit]

  1. ^ Widdows, Rob (September 2008). "The Best Kept Secrets". Motor Sport magazine archive. p. 73. Retrieved 30 August 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 361. ISBN 0851127029.
  3. ^ "Grand Prix results, Canadian GP 1970". grandprix.com. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  4. ^ "Grand Prix results, United States GP 1970". grandprix.com. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  5. ^ "Grand Prix results, Mexican GP 1970". grandprix.com. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  6. ^ "Grand Prix results, South African GP 1971". grandprix.com. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  7. ^ "Grand Prix results, United States GP 1971". grandprix.com. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  8. ^ Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 317. ISBN 0851127029.