User:Victar/Haplogroup J1c3d (Y-DNA)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Haplogroup J1c3d
Possible time of origin 5,750 to 7,500 BP
Possible place of origin Anatolia/Levant
Ancestor J1c3
Defining mutations L147.1
Highest frequencies Semites

In human genetics, Haplogroup J1c3d (L147.1) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup which is a subclade of haplogroup J1c3.

Origin[edit]

Overview map of the ancient Near East

The expansion of Haplogroup J1c3d is closely tied to the expansion of the Semitic languages, they themselves both linked to the expansion of herder–hunters moving into the arid regions of the Arabian Peninsula.[1] Kitchen et al propose the divergence within Semitic languages occurred approximately 5750 years ago in the Levant[2], which is both consistent with J1c3d's age estimate and its parent clade's place of highest diversity.

People of the Haplogroup J1c3 orginally possibly spoke a language similar to Alarodian derived languages. Semitic shows an interesting degree of relatedness with Nakho-Daghestani of Anatolia (including Turkey, Armenia, and Georgia) as Roy King has shown through his works[3], this language also could have hypothetically been involved in the formation of Afroasiatic as Haplogroup J1.

Some of its clades have been found in non-negligible frequency amongst Copts, Bejas and Guanches all of whom are non-Semitic Afroasiatic speakers while retaining the fact that African branches of Afroasiatic contain Caucasian and Sumerian loanwards, thus making another case for the lineage's Near Eastern origin.

Afroasiatic languages spread from the Levant into Africa between 7000 and 12,000 years ago, probably in more than one movement. Subsequent history has seen an enormous spread of Semitic languages, including Ethiopian Semitic and, of course, Arabic, on such a scale that the original phylogenetic geography of the Afroasiatic language family must have been considerably erased.[4]

Subclades[edit]

  • J1c3d L147.1
    • J1c3d* -
    • J1c3d1 L174.1
    • J1c3d2 L222.2 formerly J1c3d1
      • J1c3d2* - formerly J1c3d1*
        • J1c3d2a L65.2/S159.2 formerly J1c3d1a

L147.1[edit]

The SNP marker L147.1 was first found by Family Tree DNA in 2010.

Name: L147.1

Type: snp

Description:

Source: other

Position: ChrY:6813258..6813258 (+ strand)

Length: 1

ISOGG_haplogroup: J1c3d

Mutation: T to C

YCC_haplogroup: J1c3d

allele_anc: T

allele_der: C

comments: Downstream J-P58 X()

primer_f: L15-f

primer_r: L15-r

primary_id: 41467

gbrowse_dbid: ymap:database

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chiaroni, Jacques; King, Roy J.; Myres, Natalie M.; Henn, Brenna M.; Mitchell, Michael J.; Boetsch, Gilles; Sheikha, Issa; Lin, Alice A.; Nik-Ahd, Mahnoosh; Ahmad, Jabeen; Lattanzi, Francesca; Herrera, Rene J.; Ibrahim, Muntaser E.; Brody, Aaron; Semino, Ornella; Kivisild, Toomas; Underhill, Peter A. (2010). "The emergence of Y-chromosome haplogroup J1e among Arabic-speaking populations". European Journal of Human Genetics. 18: 348–353. doi:10.1038 Check |doi= value (help). 
  2. ^ Kitchen, Andrew; Ehret, Christopher; Assefa, Shiferaw; Mulligan, Connie J. (2009). "Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of Semitic languages identifies an Early Bronze Age origin of Semitic in the Near East" (PDF). Royal Society Publishing. doi:10.109 Check |doi= value (help). 
  3. ^ Peregrine, Peter (2009). Ancient Human Migrations: A Multidisciplinary Approach. University of Utah Press. ISBN 0874809428. 
  4. ^ Ehret, Christopher; Keita, S. O. Y.; Newman, Paul (2004). "The Origins of Afroasiatic" (PDF). Science. 306 (5702): 1680. 

External links[edit]

- Draft