Virginia Barbour

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Ginny Barbour
Born
Virginia M. Barbour
Alma materUniversity of Cambridge (MB BChir, MA)
University of Oxford (DPhil)
Scientific career
InstitutionsQueensland University of Technology
ThesisRegulation of the human α-globin genes by their chromatin context (1997)
Websitestaff.qut.edu.au/staff/ginny.barbour

Virginia M. Barbour is a professor at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, and serves as the Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group.[1][2] She is best known for being one of the three founding editors of PLOS Medicine, and her various roles in championing the open access movement.[3][4]

Education[edit]

Barbour pursued a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MB BChir) degree and Master of Arts (MA) degree at the University of Cambridge.[when?] This was followed by a Doctor of Philosophy degree in molecular medicine[5] at the University of Oxford where her research investigated the control of alpha globulin genes and was awarded in 1997.[5][6]

Career and research[edit]

Following her education and training, Barbour served as an executive editor at The Lancet between 1994 to 2004.[3] Barbour was one of the three founding editors of PLOS Medicine (2004-2013), and later served as the PLOS Medicine Editorial Director (2012-2014), and the PLOS Medicine and Biology Editorial Director (2014-2015).[3][7] Barbour has also served as a chair of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) for two terms (2012-2015; 2015-2017).[3][7][8][9] She serves as the director of the australasian open access strategy group (2015-present), and works as a part-time professor between the Office of Research Ethics & Integrity and the Division of Technology, Information and Learning Services, at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia.[3][6][7][8]

Barbour has published over 100 peer reviewed publications, generating over 14,000 citations and has an h-index of 20.[1][2] She has played a role in developing several reporting guidelines and open-access initiatives, including Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT), Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), Healthcare Information For All (HIFA) and Evidence AID.[6]

Selected Publications[edit]

  • Nephrotic syndrome associated with sulphasalazine[10]
  • UK Biobank: a project in search of a protocol?[11]
  • CONSORT 2010 statement: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials. 2010. BMC Medicine.[citation needed]
  • CONSORT 2010 explanation and elaboration: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials. 2012. International Journal of Surgery.[citation needed]
  • Better reporting of interventions: template for intervention description and replication (TIDieR) checklist and guide[12]
  • Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Virginia Barbour publications indexed by Google Scholar Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ a b Virginia Barbour publications from Europe PubMed Central
  3. ^ a b c d e Anon (2018). "Virginia Barbour: Queen of open access". BMJ. 363: k4148. doi:10.1136/bmj.k4148. ISSN 0959-8138. PMID 30355729.
  4. ^ Virginia Barbour on Twitter Edit this at Wikidata
  5. ^ a b Barbour, Virginia (1997). Regulation of the human α-globin genes by their chromatin context. jisc.ac.uk (DPhil thesis). University of Oxford. OCLC 43192909. EThOS uk.bl.ethos.244591.
  6. ^ a b c Barbour, Ginny. "QUT | Staff Profiles | Ginny Barbour". staff.qut.edu.au. Retrieved 19 May 2019.
  7. ^ a b c TachibanaJan. 29, Chris; 2016; Am, 9:00 (3 November 2017). "Responsibly conducting research". Science | AAAS. Retrieved 19 May 2019.
  8. ^ a b Couzin-Frankel, Jennifer (2018). "'Journalologists' use scientific methods to study academic publishing. Is their work improving science?". Science. doi:10.1126/science.aav4758. ISSN 0036-8075.
  9. ^ "Virginia Barbour | Committee on Publication Ethics: COPE". publicationethics.org. Retrieved 19 May 2019.
  10. ^ Barbour, V M; Williams, P F (1990). "Nephrotic syndrome associated with sulphasalazine". BMJ. 301 (6755): 818–818. doi:10.1136/bmj.301.6755.818-b. ISSN 0959-8138. PMC 1663947. PMID 1977483.
  11. ^ Barbour, Virginia (2003). "UK Biobank: a project in search of a protocol?". The Lancet. 361 (9370): 1734–1738. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(03)13377-6. ISSN 0140-6736. PMID 12767753.
  12. ^ Hoffmann, T. C.; Glasziou, P. P.; Boutron, I.; Milne, R.; Perera, R.; Moher, D.; Altman, D. G.; Barbour, V.; Macdonald, H.; Johnston, M.; Lamb, S. E.; Dixon-Woods, M.; McCulloch, P.; Wyatt, J. C.; Chan, A.-W.; Michie, S. (2014). "Better reporting of interventions: template for intervention description and replication (TIDieR) checklist and guide". BMJ. 348 (mar07 3): g1687–g1687. doi:10.1136/bmj.g1687. ISSN 1756-1833. PMID 24609605.
  13. ^ Shamseer, Larissa; Moher, David; Maduekwe, Onyi; Turner, Lucy; Barbour, Virginia; Burch, Rebecca; Clark, Jocalyn; Galipeau, James; Roberts, Jason; Shea, Beverley J. (2017). "Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison". BMC Medicine. 15 (1). doi:10.1186/s12916-017-0785-9. ISSN 1741-7015. PMC 5353955. PMID 28298236.

External links[edit]