W.A.K.O. European Championships 2002

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W.A.K.O. European Championships 2002
Wako.jpg
A poster or logo for W.A.K.O. European Championships 2002.
Information
Promotion W.A.K.O.
Date November 22 (Start)
November 27, 2002 (End)
Venue Palasport Cornaro
City Italy Jesolo, Italy
Event chronology
W.A.K.O. World Championships 2001 (Belgrade) W.A.K.O. European Championships 2002 W.A.K.O. World Championships 2003 (Paris)

W.A.K.O. European Championships 2002 in Jesolo was the sixteenth European championships to be held by the W.A.K.O.. It was the second championships to be held in Jesolo and the seventh (including world championships) to be held in Italy. W.A.K.O. had originally hoped to have a joint event that year as they had with the last world championships, with an event in Greece in October and another in Hungary (and then Slovakia) in November but due to the difficulties involved scrapped the idea and resorted to Jesolo which had held a successful event two years previously.[1][2]

The event was open to amateur men and women from across Europe (with Iran rather unusually participating at a Euro championships) and there were seven styles available; Full Contact, Low-Kick (men only), Thai-Boxing (men only), Light-Contact, Semi-Contact, Musical Forms and Aero-Kickboxing (making its W.A.K.O. debut). Each country was allowed one competitor per weight division in all styles expect Musical Forms and Aero-Kickboxing, although some contestants were allowed to participate in more than one style (mainly the case with Semi and Light-Contact). By the end of the championships Russia was the strongest nation overall, with hosts Italy in second and Belarus in the third. The event was held over six days in the Palasport Cornaro in Jesolo Italy, beginning on Friday November 22nd and ending on Wednesday November 27th, 2002.[3][4]

Full-Contact[edit]

Full-Contact is a style of kickboxing where punches and kicks are allowed to be thrown by the participants at full force, with strikes below the waist prohibited. Most fights result in a judge’s decision or stoppage victory and as with most other forms of amateur kickboxing, head and various body protection must be worn. More information on Full-Contact and the rules can be found at the official W.A.K.O. website.[5] At Jesolo the men had twelve weight divisions ranging from 51 kg/112.2 lbs to over 91 kg/+200.2 lbs, while the women had seven ranging from 48 kg/105.6 lbs to over 70 kg/+143 lbs. Notable winners included a young Muamer Hukić (more commonly known as the cruiserweight boxing champion Marco Huck) and there were a number of repeat winners from the last world championships in Belgrade with Ramadani Besnik, Fouad Habbani, Olesya Gladkova, Oxana Vassileva, Barbara Plazzoli and Marjut Lappalainen all picking up gold medals. By the end of the championships Russia were easily the top nation in Full-Contact winning eight gold, one silver and two bronze medals.[6]

Men's Full-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-51 kg Dmitry Ayzyatulov Russia Francisco Fernandes Portugal Mario Basic Croatia
-54 kg Bruno Manca Italy Andrej Kutlesa Croatia Vardan Sahakyan Armenia
-57 kg Fouad Habbani France Youness Bouignane Norway Boris Klimenko Russia
Damian Ławniczak Poland
-60 kg Vladimir Pykhtin Russia Michal Tomczykowski Poland Giampaolo Spanu Italy
Giampaolo Spanu France
-63.5 kg Movsar Kodzoev Georgia (country) Malik Mangouchi France Alexandru Pogorelov Russia
Jere Reinikainen Finland
-67 kg Sergey Uspensky Russia Dietrich Streckert Germany Adriano Ferrari Italy
Ibrahim Cicek Turkey
-71 kg Rafael Gazayev Azerbaijan Jens Lintow Germany Adam Tutaev Moldova
Robert Arvai Hungary
-75 kg Ramadani Besnik Switzerland Tomasz Walenski Poland Markus Hakulinen Finland
Marco Novelli Italy
-81 kg Allan Kotsoev Russia Radev Svetoslav Bulgaria Marcin Rogozik Poland
Sergei Baranov Estonia
-86 kg Muamer Hukić Germany Yohann Le Maire France Anders Gustavsson Sweden
Slobodan Marinkovic Serbia and Montenegro
-91 kg Dmitri Guerassimov Russia Maugeri Piero Italy Pavlon Velin Bulgaria
Sobin Mijo Croatia
+91 kg Duško Basrak Serbia and Montenegro Florentin Pintescu Romania Jimmy Upton Republic of Ireland
Zsolt Sarosi Hungary

Women's Full-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-48 kg Olesya Gladkova Russia Veronique Legras France Rita Takacs Hungary
Cinzia Vargiu Italy
-52 kg Oksana Vasilieva Russia Fatma Akyüz Germany Galina Ivanova Bulgaria
Mette Solli Norway
-56 kg Barbara Plazzoli Italy Bianca Hermansen Denmark Edyta Olewniczak Poland
Goranka Blagojevic Serbia and Montenegro
-60 kg Julia Kiblawi Lebanon Milijanka Cenic Serbia and Montenegro Nadine Lemke Germany
Stina Olsen Denmark
-65 kg Maria Karlova Russia Edith Tati Kiss Romania Deryan Nalkiran Turkey
Csilla Csejtei Hungary
-70 kg Marjut Lappalainen Finland Siren Soras Norway Ivana Derdic Croatia
Kiymet Karpuzoglu Turkey
+70 kg Anja Renfordt Germany Galina Ivanova Russia Daniela Lazzareska Republic of Macedonia
Eleonore Coutelas France

Low-Kick[edit]

Low-Kick is a style of kickboxing wherein punches and kicks are allowed to be thrown by the participants at full force, only differing from Full-Contact in that kicks to the leg are also allowed. Most fights result in a point's decision or stoppage victory and as with most other forms of amateur kickboxing, head and various body protection must be worn. More information on Low-Kick rules can be found at the W.A.K.O. website.[7] Available to men only there were twelve weight divisions in Jesolo, ranging from 51 kg/112.2 lbs to over 91 kg/+200.2 lbs. While there were few notable winners Evgeniy Khil and Ivan Sočo were double winners having also won gold at the last world championships in Belgrade and future K-1 MAX and SuperLeague fighter Luis Reis won a silver medal. By the championships end Russia was the strongest nation in the style, amassing four golds, three silvers and one bronze.[8]

Men's Low-Kick Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-51 kg Gianpietro Marceddu Italy Pavel Isinbaev Russia Denis Karyavy Belarus
-54 kg Bodan Marinkovic Serbia and Montenegro Alexander Sidorov Russia Francesco De Luca Italy
Vardan Sahakyan Armenia
-57 kg Evgeniy Khil Russia Mariusz Cieśliński Poland Gabor Kiss Hungary
Toni Vegee France
-60 kg Viatcheslav Tislenko Russia Eduard Mammadov Azerbaijan Nikola Petrovic Serbia and Montenegro
Shkan Kharakhanov Armenia
-63.5 kg Toma Tomov Bulgaria Sami Tomann Finland Nikola Mladenovic Serbia and Montenegro
Luca Carta Italy
-67 kg Ioussoup Issaev Russia Luis Reis Portugal Franco Lazzaro Italy
Csaba Molnár Serbia and Montenegro
-71 kg Fouad Ezbiri France Konstantin Beloussov Russia Attila Nagy Hungary
Milan Cvetkovic Serbia and Montenegro
-75 kg Hrvoje Jukic Croatia Ali Khanjari Iran Akos Panak Hungary
Stefano Paone Italy
-81 kg Drazenko Ninic Republika Srpska Stjepan Glavica Croatia Mohammed Reza Doudeh Iran
Dénes Rácz Hungary
-86 kg Dejan Milosavljevic Serbia and Montenegro Gabor Meiszter Hungary Ilko Makshutov Bulgaria
Teppo Laine Finland
-91 kg Ivan Sočo Serbia and Montenegro Dmitri Vorobjov Estonia Anton Volkov Russia
Hamza Aouad Lebanon
+91 kg Ruslan Bisaev Russia Dragan Jovanović Serbia and Montenegro Ivica Perkovic Croatia

Thai-Boxing[edit]

Thai-boxing (more commonly known as Muay Thai is the most physical style of kickboxing in which the contestants use punches, kicks, elbows and knees to attempt to defeat their opponent, often by referee stoppage or via a point's decision. As with other forms of amateur kickboxing, participants must wear head and body protection. At Jesolo the category was open to men only with just nine weight divisions ranging from 57 kg/125.4 lbs to over 91 kg/+200.2 lbs - three down from Belgrade where there were twelve. The lower than anticipated number of contestants can be explained due to the emergency moving of the W.A.K.O. event, originally a joint event, to Jesolo on a weekend which also included two other international amateur Muay Thai events – the I.A.M.T.F. European championships in Portugal and the I.F.M.A. World Championships in Paris.[9] Despite missing some of Europe's top fighters the event had several notable winners in Dmitry Shakuta and Ivan Tolkachev who had won gold at the last world championships in Belgrade, as well as Vasily Shish who like the two mentioned before would win multiple world and European titles. By the end of the event Belarus were easily the top nation in Thai-Boxing winning five golds and one silver.[10]

Men's Thai-Boxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-57 kg Emin Suleymanov Azerbaijan Sergei Shimanski Belarus Vinko Dirlic Croatia
-60 kg Vahidin Tufekcic Bosnia and Herzegovina Paolo Barvero Italy No bronze medallists recorded
-67 kg Vasily Shish Belarus Nebojsa Denic Croatia Morgan Lundkvist Sweden
Sergey Zaharchuk Ukraine
-71 kg Kirill Ostrouhov Belarus Ibrahim Zaibak State of Palestine Raafat Fares Lebanon
Hassan Ali Mohammadi Iran
-75 kg Dmitry Shakuta Belarus Milan Maljkovic Serbia and Montenegro Kassem Daher Lebanon
Emilio Mansione Italy
-81 kg Lorenzo Borgomeo Italy Mario Milosavljevic Serbia and Montenegro No bronze medallists recorded
-86 kg Stanko Pavlovic Serbia and Montenegro Mohamed Zaidan Lebanon No bronze medallists recorded
-91 kg Ivan Tolkachev Belarus Hasan Mansour Lebanon No bronze medallists recorded
+91 kg Eduard Voznovich Belarus Milan Rabrenovic Republic of Macedonia Kiril Pendzurov Bulgaria

Light-Contact[edit]

Light-Contact is a form of kickboxing where points are scored on speed and technique and strikes must be thrown with moderate (not full force). It is less physical than Full-Contact but more so than Semi and is often seen as a transitional stage between the two and as with other forms of amateur kickboxing head and body protection must be worn. More detail on Light-Contact and the rules can be found on the W.A.K.O. website.[11] Both men and women participated in the style with the men having eight weight divisions (one less than at Maribor) ranging from 63 kg/138.6 lbs to over 94 kg/+206.8 lbs while the women had six ranging from 50 kg/110 lbs to over 70 kg/154 lbs. Although not full of recognisable names there were a number of repeat winners at Jesolo with Marcel Pekonja, Zoltan Dancso, Wojciech Szczerbinski, Szilvia Csicsely and Nadja Sibila all having won gold medals at the last world championships in Maribor. By the end of the event Poland was the strongest nation in the style winning five golds, three silvers and two bronze medals.[12]

Men's Light-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-63 kg Dmitri Kozlov Russia Chris Collymore United Kingdom Jorge Coelho Germany
Maciej Dominczak Poland
-69 kg Marcel Fekonja Slovenia Christian Bauer Germany Philipe Schmid Switzerland
Sead Pejmanovic Croatia
-74 kg Rafal Petertil Poland Mikhail Sorin Russia Oliver Stricz Hungary
Christian Piras Switzerland
-79 kg Zoltan Dancso Hungary Andrea Primitivi Italy Marat Pukhaev Russia
Hugo Matos Portugal
-84 kg Martin Albers Germany Bogumil Polonski Poland Marco Tagliaferri Italy
Vladimir Blagodiyr Russia
-89 kg Wojciech Myslinski Poland Bernd Reichenbach Germany Uros Urleb Slovenia
Colin O'Shaughnessy Republic of Ireland
-94 kg Michal Wszelak Poland Ivan Caprio Italy Aleksandre Stokovski Republic of Macedonia
+94 kg Wojciech Szczerbiński Poland Drazen Glavas Croatia Yuri Abramov Russia
Matej Lepenik Slovenia

Women's Light-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-50 kg Szilvia Csicsely Hungary Julita Tkaczyk Poland Ekaterina Dunbrava Russia
Mateja Rabotek Slovenia
-55 kg Alessia Gaietto Italy Zaneta Kruk Poland Sabine Seifert Germany
Christina McMahon Republic of Ireland
-60 kg Julie McHale Republic of Ireland Sonia Biancucci Italy Caiado Funanda Brazil
Damiris Favre-Rochex France
-65 kg Maike Golzenleuchter Germany Szilvia Linczmayer Hungary Sanja Stunja Croatia
Helen Barnhard United Kingdom
-70 kg Karolina Lukasik Poland Nusa Rajher Slovenia Sarah Martin United Kingdom
Pierina Guerreri Italy
+70 kg Nadja Sibila Slovenia Oxana Kikakh Russia Ellen McAllister United Kingdom
Beata Lawrynowicz Poland

Semi-Contact[edit]

Semi-Contact is the least physical of the contact kickboxing styles available at W.A.K.O. events. It involves the participants throwing controlled strikes at targets above the waist, with point's scored on the basis of speed and technique with power prohibited. Despite the less physical nature all contestants must wear head and various body protection - more detail on the Semi-Contact and the rules can be found on the official W.A.K.O. website.[13] Both men and women participated in the style with the men having nine weight divisions ranging from 57 kg/125.4 lbs to over 94 kg/+206.8 lbs and the women having six ranging from 50 kg/110 lbs to over 70 kg/154 lbs. Not full of noticeable names there were a number of repeat winners with Dezső Debreczeni, Samantha Aquilano, Luisa Lico and Nadja Sibila all having won gold at the last world championships in Maribor. By the championships end Great Britain were the strongest country in Semi-Contact winning four golds, one silver and one bronze medal.[14]

Men's Semi-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-57 kg Dezső Debreczeni Hungary Rolf Leipert Germany Alberto Martini Italy
Andrzej Maciazek Poland
-63 kg Nico Thommen Switzerland Tomasz Kwasny Poland Roberto Belotti Italy
Albert Frommel Austria
-69 kg Jacey Cashman United Kingdom Christian Boujibar Switzerland Premyslaw Ziemnicki Poland
Steven de Block Belgium
-74 kg Roy Baker Republic of Ireland Dimitri Gaulis Switzerland Bjorn Baert Belgium
Nick Memmos Greece
-79 kg Kurt Baert Belgium Billy Bryce United Kingdom Michel Decian Switzerland
Neri Stella Italy
-84 kg Sam Timmis United Kingdom Günther Schönrock Germany Igor Kaslek Slovenia
Emre Cetin Turkey
-89 kg Peter Csikos Hungary Daniel Weil Germany Matej Sibila Slovenia
Roberto Montuoro Italy
-94 kg Mark Brown United Kingdom Laszlo Toth Hungary Pero Gazilj Slovenia
Martin Kaiser Liechtenstein
+94 kg Terry Hillman United Kingdom Darragh Geoghegan Republic of Ireland Karl Heinz Kohlbrenner Germany
Luca Letizia Italy

Women's Semi-Contact Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
-50 kg Samantha Aquilano Italy Renate Sandland Norway Katarzyna Nokaw Poland
Natalia Boulik Russia
-55 kg Monica Compagno Italy Gonca Thurm Germany Julia Trofimova Russia
Manuela Grobotek Croatia
-60 kg Luisa Lico Italy Brigita Plemenitas Slovenia Damiris Favre-Rochex France
Cara Donovan Republic of Ireland
-65 kg Cecilia Brækhus Norway Urska Dolinsek Slovenia Gloria de Bei Italy
Patrizia Berlingieri Switzerland
-70 kg Adriane Doppler Germany Elaine Small Republic of Ireland Anna Migliaccio Italy
Kelly Gillis Belgium
+70 kg Nadja Sibila Slovenia Nicola Corbett Republic of Ireland Mieke Hink United Kingdom
Oxana Kinakh Russia

Musical Forms[edit]

Musical Forms is a non-physical competition which sees the contestants fighting against imaginary foes using Martial Arts techniques - more information on the style can be found on the W.A.K.O. website.[15] The men and women competed in four different styles explained below:

Notable winners included Christian Brell, Andrei Roukavistnikov, Sandra Hess and Veronica Dombrovskaya who added to the winners medals they had collected at the last world championships in Maribor, with Dombrovskaya also being a double winner in Musical Forms at Jesolo. By the end of the championships Belarus were the strongest nation in the style, winning three gold medals, one silver and one bronze overall.[16]

Men's Musical Forms Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Hard Styles Ashley Beck United Kingdom Christian Brell Germany Steffen Bernhardt Germany
Soft Styles Andrei Roukavistnikov Russia Andrey Bosak Russia Castellacci Massimiliano Italy
Hard Styles with Weapons Christian Brell Germany Steffen Bernhardt Germany Ashley Beck United Kingdom
Soft Styles with Weapons Andrey Bosak Russia Andrei Roukavistnikov Russia Michael Moeller Germany

Women's Musical Forms Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Hard Styles Sandra Hess Germany Samantha Smythe United Kingdom Olga Koudinova Russia
Soft Styles Veronica Dombrovskaya Belarus Mariya Pekarchik Belarus Ewa Sliwa Poland
Hard Styles with Weapons Veronica Dombrovskaya Belarus Olga Koudinova Russia Mariya Pekarchik Belarus
Soft Styles with Weapons Mariya Pekarchik Belarus Ekaterina Tchijikova Russia Veronica Dombrovskaya Russia

Aero-Kickboxing[edit]

Aero-Kickboxing made its debut at a W.A.K.O. championships in Jesolo. Like Musical Forms it is a non physical competition involving aerobic and kickboxing techniques in time to specifically selected music – more information on Aero-Kickboxing and the rule set can be found on the W.A.K.O. website.[17] There were three categories in Jesolo; male, female and a mixed sex team event. By the end of the championships France was the top nation making a clean sweep of all three gold medal positions.[18]

Men's Aero-Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Aero Men Jean Luc Kitoko France Harald Rainer Austria No bronze medallist recorded

Women's Aero-Kickboxing Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Aero Women Suzan Aycin France Marina Nikolic Croatia Beata Krassoi Italy

Aero-Kickboxing (Team) Medals Table[edit]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Aero Team Team France I France Team Italy II Italy Team Italy I Italy

Overall Medals Standing (Top 5)[edit]

Ranking Country Gold Gold Silver Silver Bronze Bronze
1 Russia Russia 15 10 11
2 Italy Italy 8 6 18
3 Belarus Belarus 8 2 2
4 Germany Germany 7 11 6
5 Poland Poland 5 6 9

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Europeans in Jesolo (Italian language - report on event)". www.ilguerriero.it. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  2. ^ "Wako Events In Hungary (mentions orig scheduled WAKO events in 2002)". axkickboxing.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  3. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  4. ^ "Kickbox-Ergebnisse (In German - results info etc from Jesolo)". www.kickboxer.de. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  5. ^ "WAKO Full contact Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  6. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002 (FULLKONTAKT)" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  7. ^ "WAKO Low-Kick Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  8. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002 (Low-Kick)" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  9. ^ "Europeans in Jesolo (Italian language - mentions Thai-Boxing and other championships)". www.ilguerriero.it. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  10. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002 (Thai-Boxing)" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  11. ^ "WAKO Light-Contact Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  12. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002 (Leight contact)" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  13. ^ "Semi-Contact Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  14. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002 (Semicontact)" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  15. ^ "WAKO Musical Forms Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-05-30. 
  16. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002 (Musical Forms)" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-05-30. 
  17. ^ "WAKO Aero Kickboxing Rules" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 
  18. ^ "Results Kickboxing European Championship 2002 (Aero-Kickboxing)" (PDF). www.wakoweb.com. Retrieved 2011-06-04. 

External links[edit]