WOXO (AM)

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WOXO
WOXOAMFM.png
City South Paris, Maine
Broadcast area Oxford County, Maine
Branding The Ox
Slogan Maine's Real Country
Frequency 1450 kHz
Translator(s) 96.9 W245CQ (South Paris)
First air date October 28, 1955 (1955-10-28)[1]
Format Country music
Power 1,000 watts (unlimited)
Class C
Facility ID 52176
Transmitter coordinates 44°13′16″N 70°31′43″W / 44.22111°N 70.52861°W / 44.22111; -70.52861 (WOXO)
Former callsigns WKTQ (1955–1973)
WKTP (1973–1976)
WXIV (1976–1981)
WOXO (1981–1986)
WKTQ (1986–2016)[2]
Owner Gleason Radio Group
(Mountain Valley Broadcasting, Inc.)
Sister stations WEZR, WEZR-FM, WOXO-FM, WTME
Webcast Listen Live
Website www.woxo.com
WOXO-FM
City Mexico, Maine
Broadcast area Oxford County, Maine
Branding The Ox
Slogan Maine's Real Country
Frequency 100.7 MHz
First air date September 15, 1988 (1988-09-15)[1]
Format Country music
ERP 850 watts
HAAT 388 meters
Class C3
Facility ID 46323
Transmitter coordinates 44°34′56″N 70°37′59″W / 44.58222°N 70.63306°W / 44.58222; -70.63306 (WOXO-FM)
Former callsigns WTBM (1987–2016)
Owner Gleason Media Group
(Mountain Valley Broadcasting, Inc.)
Sister stations WEZR, WEZR-FM, WOXO, WTME
Website www.woxo.com

WOXO (1450 AM; "The Ox") is a radio station licensed to serve South Paris, Maine. WOXO-FM (100.7 FM) is a radio station licensed to serve Mexico, Maine. Both stations are owned by Gleason Radio Group and licensed to Mountain Valley Broadcasting, Inc. They air a country music format. WOXO's programming is also heard on W245CQ (96.9 FM) in South Paris. WOXO went on the air in 1955 as WKTQ, and WOXO-FM went on the air in 1988 as WTBM; both stations were assigned their present call letters on August 1, 2016.[2][3]

History[edit]

WOXO[edit]

WOXO signed on October 28, 1955[1] as WKTQ under the ownership of Oxford Broadcasting Corporation.[4] In its early years, WKTQ's programming included news, music, and sports.[4] The station affiliated with the Mutual Broadcasting System in June 1965,[5] and switched to ABC Radio's Entertainment network in 1972.[6] By this point, WKTQ had a variety format that included 42 hours a week of country music.[7] The call letters were changed to WKTP in 1973.[8]

Richard Gleason, owner of WOXO (92.7 FM) in Norway, bought WKTP for $130,000 in 1976[9] and changed its call letters to WXIV.[10] The station had a country music format at the time;[11] by 1977, WXIV had changed to a top 40 format, with 80 percent of the programming simulcast on WOXO.[12] WXIV's call letters were changed to WOXO on November 23, 1981;[2] the station continued to simulcast with WOXO-FM,[13] which changed to a country music format that year.[14] Later in the 1980s, the station shifted to religious programming;[15][16] this programming was simulcast on WTME (1530 AM) in Auburn,[13] which Gleason purchased in 1985.[17] The call letters were changed back to WKTQ on January 15, 1986.[2] The simulcast on WTME moved to 1240 AM in Lewiston in 1990, after Gleason acquired that facility and shut down the 1530 AM transmitter.[13] WLLB (790 AM) in Rumford began simulcasting WKTQ and WTME in 2001, following Gleason's purchase of that station;[18] later that year, WLLB took the WTME call letters from 1240[19] (which became WCNM and, in 2007, WEZR) and moved to 780 AM.[20]

WKTQ returned to the WOXO call letters on August 1, 2016;[2] at that time, the station began to simulcast on W245CQ (96.9 FM) and took on the country music format previously heard on WOXO-FM, which changed its call letters to WEZR-FM and began simulcasting WEZR's hot adult contemporary format.[21][22]

WOXO-FM[edit]

WOXO-FM signed on September 15, 1988[1] as WTBM, owned by Tanist Broadcasting Corporation and programming country music, album-oriented rock, and adult contemporary music.[23] Mountain Valley Broadcasting bought the station in 1990[24] and converted it to a simulcast of WOXO-FM.[13] The station took on the WOXO-FM call letters on August 1, 2016[3] as part of the move of WOXO's country music programming from 92.7 FM to 1450 AM and 96.9 FM;[22] the 100.7 facility retained the country music format.[21][22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 1999 (PDF). 1999. pp. D-200–1. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Call Sign History (WOXO)". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database.
  3. ^ a b "Call Sign History (WOXO-FM)". CDBS Public Access. Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  4. ^ a b "WKTQ South Paris, Me., Starts With 15½-Hour Schedule" (PDF). Broadcasting-Telecasting. November 28, 1955. p. 90. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  5. ^ "Mutual signs seven into fold" (PDF). Broadcasting. July 5, 1965. p. 10. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  6. ^ "Media Briefs" (PDF). Broadcasting. May 29, 1972. p. 36. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  7. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1973 (PDF). 1973. p. B-90. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  8. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. May 21, 1973. p. 64. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  9. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. August 16, 1976. p. 50. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  10. ^ "Call Letters" (PDF). Broadcasting. October 4, 1976. p. 68. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  11. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1977 (PDF). 1977. p. C-94. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  12. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1978 (PDF). 1978. pp. C-96–7. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  13. ^ a b c d Fybush, Scott. "Maine Radio History, 1971–1996". The Archives at BostonRadio.org. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  14. ^ Marois, Dan (2016–2017). "Hitting the Airwaves For Over 40 Years". Oxford Hills Magazine. pp. 28–9. Retrieved August 11, 2016.
  15. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1983 (PDF). 1983. pp. B-109. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  16. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1984 (PDF). 1984. pp. B-116. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  17. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. February 4, 1985. p. 88. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  18. ^ Fybush, Scott (February 5, 2001). "River Flows to New Home". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  19. ^ Fybush, Scott (July 16, 2001). "CTV Adds Montreal to O&O Roster". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  20. ^ Fybush, Scott (January 14, 2002). "Maine Signal Powers Up; NYC LPTV Loses Allocation Battle". North East RadioWatch. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  21. ^ a b Crosby, Christopher (August 1, 2016). "Radio station WOXO changes frequencies". Sun Journal. Retrieved August 2, 2016.
  22. ^ a b c Venta, Lance (July 29, 2016). "WEZR & WOXO Lewiston On The Move". RadioInsight. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  23. ^ The Broadcasting Yearbook 1990 (PDF). 1990. pp. B-142. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  24. ^ "Changing Hands" (PDF). Broadcasting. October 8, 1990. p. 64. Retrieved August 27, 2016.

External links[edit]