Walthourville, Georgia

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Walthourville, Georgia
City hall
City hall
Location in Liberty County and the state of Georgia
Location in Liberty County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 31°46′34″N 81°37′27″W / 31.77611°N 81.62417°W / 31.77611; -81.62417Coordinates: 31°46′34″N 81°37′27″W / 31.77611°N 81.62417°W / 31.77611; -81.62417
CountryUnited States
StateGeorgia
CountyLiberty
Area
 • Total3.8 sq mi (9.8 km2)
 • Land3.8 sq mi (9.8 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
89 ft (27 m)
Population
 • Total4,111
 • Estimate 
(2016)[1]
3,959
 • Density1,065/sq mi (411.2/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
31333
Area code(s)912
FIPS code13-80256[2]
GNIS feature ID0356617[3]
Websitecityofwalthourville.com

Walthourville is a city in Liberty County, Georgia, United States. When it was incorporated in 1974, it had a government entirely composed of women; and in 1978 it elected Carrie Kent, the first African-american woman mayor in Georgia history. Walthourville is a part of the Hinesville-Fort Stewart metropolitan statistical area. The population was 4,111 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

Walthourville draws its name from Andrew Walthour, a revolutionary soldier and a physician who established a plantation in the area circa 1795. By the 1840s the town was one of the most prosperous towns in south Georgia.[4]

By 1974 the town had an airstrip and an industrial park, and there was some concern the area might be annexed by nearby Hinesville, Georgia. Although the town was 179 years old, it was not officially chartered by the state. An attempt to do so by the male leaders of the town some 12 years earlier had failed due in part to "bickering."[5]

A committee entirely composed of women completed the necessary census and circulated a petition as required, getting 300 signatures.[6] When they filed the paperwork with the Georgia General Assembly for approval they named themselves the incorporating officers. "We thought it was all just on paper", said Mayor Lyndol Anderson.[5] But when the approved papers arrived (signed by then-Governor Jimmy Carter[7]) they realized they were required to serve as town government until the first election in December.[5]

2007 Historical marker

They were sworn into office in April 1974[6] becoming the one of the first all-woman governments of a municipality in Georgia history.[8] (The first known instance was Oak Park in 1934[9]). Coming as it did at the height of the women's liberation movement, the all-woman government of the town attracted much attention including national coverage by A.P.,[10] UPI,[11] NBC Nightly News with John Chancellor[12][13] and CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite.[14][15] The women of Walthourville, however, repeatedly rejected the label of "women's libbers".[14][16]

In December 1974 the all-woman slate ran in its first election, and were challenged by a slate of male candidates, none of whom succeeded.[10][13][17] The women had proven themselves good campaigners[16] as well as good governors. They had gotten streetlights installed in the town and put up street signs, and had not only levied no new taxes, but they had donated their own (nominal) official salaries back to the town.[5]

Four years later, one man did join the council in the 1978 election.[18] In the same election, council member Carrie Kent was elected mayor - the first African-american woman to be elected mayor in Georgia.[18] In 2007 the town erected a historical marker commemorating the history of its incorporation (see photo).

Points of interest[edit]

In the vicinity of Walthourville across the county line near the intersection of Tibet Highway and Griffin Road lies Tea Grove Plantation, an outdoor collection of historic buildings, vehicles, and farming equipment open to the public.[19]

Walthourville Presbyterian Church is on the National Register of Historical Places.

Geography[edit]

Walthourville is located at 31°46′34″N 81°37′27″W / 31.77611°N 81.62417°W / 31.77611; -81.62417 (31.776124, -81.624229).[20]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.8 square miles (9.8 km²), all land.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1980905
19902,024123.6%
20004,03099.1%
20104,1112.0%
Est. 20163,959[1]−3.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[21]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,111 people residing in the city. The racial makeup of the city was 56.9% Black, 27.6% White, 0.6% Native American, 1.4% Asian, 0.5% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from some other race and 4.4% from two or more races. 8.3% were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 4,030 people, 1,361 households, and 1,012 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,064.2 people per square mile (410.6/km²). There were 1,639 housing units at an average density of 432.8 per square mile (167.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 36.97% White, 55.06% African American, 0.87% Native American, 0.94% Asian, 0.35% Pacific Islander, 2.98% from other races, and 2.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.38% of the population.

There were 1,361 households out of which 51.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.0% were married couples living together, 15.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.6% were non-families. 19.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.39.

In the city, the population was spread out with 36.3% under the age of 18, 15.2% from 18 to 24, 36.0% from 25 to 44, 9.8% from 45 to 64, and 2.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,359, and the median income for a family was $34,980. Males had a median income of $26,382 versus $20,270 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,291. About 13.4% of families and 15.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.3% of those under age 18 and 21.1% of those age 65 or over.

Government and infrastructure[edit]

Walthourville Post Office

The United States Postal Service operates the Walthourville Post Office.[22]

Education[edit]

The Liberty County School District operates public schools serving Walthourville.

Notable people[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ "History". City of Walthourville. Archived from the original on April 24, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d Woodhead, Henry (February 16, 1975). "The City Mothers of Walthourville". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Magazine. pp. 6, 8, 10, 22–23. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b "Women Run New Town's Government". The Atlanta Constitution. April 13, 1974. p. 12-A. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  7. ^ Manhatton, Mike (June 24, 2009). "Mother Carrie Kent Brown Laid to Rest". WTOC-TV. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  8. ^ "Battle of the Sexes - In Walthourville Election, It's Women Versus Men". The Atlanta Constitution. November 22, 1974. p. 2-B. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Associated Press (December 15, 1934). "Petticoat Rule Supplanting Men in Georgia Town". Palm Beach Post-Times. Palm Beach, Florida. p. 1. Archived from the original on November 20, 2018. Retrieved November 20, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  10. ^ a b Associated Press (December 5, 1974). "Gals defeat men to run town". The Miami News. p. 1. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  11. ^ United Press International (August 15, 1974). "Women Running Show in Walthourville". Alexandria Daily Town Talk. p. B-8. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Chancellor, John; Jones, Kenley (December 4, 1974). "Walthourville, Georgia / Government Elections segment #474985". in transcript: NBC Nightly News. Retrieved November 19, 2018 – via Vanderbilt Television News Archive.
  13. ^ a b Chancellor, John (December 5, 1974). "Walthourville, Georgia / Election Returns segment #475002". in transcript: NBC Nightly News. Retrieved November 19, 2018 – via Vanderbilt Television News Archive.
  14. ^ a b Cronkite, Walter; Goldberg, Bernard (April 17, 1974). "Women Rule / Georgia, segment #233908". in transcript: CBS Evening News. Retrieved November 19, 2018 – via Vanderbilt Television News Archive.
  15. ^ Cronkite, Walter; Goldberg, Bernard (December 3, 1974). "Walthourville, Georgia / All-Woman Government Challenged, segment #232674". in transcript: CBS Evening News. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via Vanderbilt Television News Archive.
  16. ^ a b Rigert, Joe (August 4, 1976). "Walthourville's women carve new political trail". Minneapolis Tribune. pp. 1A, 6A. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "The Ladies Get the Vote". The Atlanta Constitution. December 5, 1974. p. 3-D. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  18. ^ a b "Black Woman Elected Mayor". The Atlanta Constitution. December 29, 1978. p. 3-C. Archived from the original on November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-08-11. Retrieved 2014-07-30.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  20. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  21. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  22. ^ "Walthourville." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on May 9, 2017. "52 TALMADGE RD WALTHOURVILLE, GA 31333-9998"

External links[edit]