Vyshnivets

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Vyshnivets
Вишнівець
Coat of arms of Vyshnivets
Coat of arms
Vyshnivets is located in Ternopil Oblast
Vyshnivets
Vyshnivets
Location of Vyshnivets
Coordinates: 49°54′00″N 25°44′00″E / 49.90000°N 25.73333°E / 49.90000; 25.73333Coordinates: 49°54′00″N 25°44′00″E / 49.90000°N 25.73333°E / 49.90000; 25.73333
Country  Ukraine
Oblast  Ternopil Oblast
Raion Zbarazh Raion
Founded 1395
Town status 1960
Area
 • Total 6 km2 (2 sq mi)
Population (1994)
 • Total 3,469
 • Density 555/km2 (1,440/sq mi)
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Postal code 47313
Area code(s) +380
Website gska2.rada.gov.ua:7777/pls/z7502/A005?rdat1=10.03.2007&rf7571=30897

Vyshnivets (Ukrainian: Вишнівець, translit. Vyshnivets’; Polish: Wiśniowiec), formerly known as Wiśniowiec, is an urban-type settlement in the Zbarazkyi Raion (district) of the Ternopil Oblast (province) of western Ukraine.

History[edit]

Early History, to 1939[edit]

The area was first settled in 1395, when the first defensive castle was constructed by Dmytro Korybut,who had acquired the land from Prince Vitovt[1]

The town is located on the Horyn River, a right tributary of the Prypiat. Before World War II the village was located in Poland.

The town served as a family seat of the Polish princely Wiśniowiecki family, as of the 15th century, and received its name from the family. The town was noted for its extensive cherry orchards.[2] In the mid-1500s, one of the family's descendants, Dmytro Vyshnevetsky (1516-1563), was distinguished by his service to Ivan the Terrible. His grandson, Jeremi Wiśniowiecki, also known as Yarema Vyshnevetsky (1612-1651) was also a distinguished military commander. During the time of the leadership of Princes Michael and Valusah Wiśniowiecki, as of 1674, the town was on the verge of becoming a Russian capital.[2]

Architectural landmarks in the town include a 15th-century castle; and palace and park, constructed in the 18th century by the Vyshnevetskyi family.

1939-1945[edit]

The town is historically associated with the Holocaust. Prior to the commencement of World War II, approximately 5,000 persons of Jewish faith were residents of the town.[2] The town was directly in the path of the German invasion of Russia in June 1941, following the repudiation by Germany of the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact.[2]

On August 11–12, 1942, German troops and Ukrainian Auxiliary Police executed nearly 2,700 Jewish men, women and children. Of those executed, approximately 900 were children.[3] It is estimated that less than 100 of the town residents of Jewish faith ultimately survived the Holocaust.[2]

Post-1945[edit]

In 1960, Vyshnivets was changed from the status of a village, to that of an Urban-type settlement. The population of the town was 3,469 as of 1994.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Uncredited, Vyshnivets; baltia.com. Retrieved 2016-09-09.
  2. ^ a b c d e Louis Parnes, The Vanishing Generations (1954), as extracted by Arlene Parnes,Vishnevets. JewishGen, KehilaLinks. Retrieved 2016-09-05.
  3. ^ Martin Dean, German Ghettoization in Occupied Ukraine: Regional Patterns and Sources. Paper presented at The Holocaust in Ukraine: New Sources and Perspectives. Centre for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2013. Retrieved 2016-09-05.

External links[edit]