Wild Things (EP)

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Wild Things
Wild-things.jpg
EP by
Released25 September 1981
Recorded25–27 May 1981
StudioLondon
GenrePost-punk, exotica
LabelPolydor
ProducerMike Hedges
The Creatures
The Creatures chronology
Wild Things
(1981)
Feast
(1983)
Siouxsie chronology
Juju
Siouxsie and the Banshees

(1981)
Wild Things
(1981)
A Kiss in the Dreamhouse
Siouxsie and the Banshees

(1982)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars link

Wild Things is the first release by British duo the Creatures (singer Siouxsie Sioux and drummer Budgie). It was issued on 25 September 1981 by Polydor Records as two 7" single records in a "double-album" style card cover, and is usually referred to as an EP. It peaked in the UK Singles Chart at No. 24,[1] and the pair performed "Mad Eyed Screamer" on Top of the Pops. The EP was entirely remastered in 1997 and reissued as part of the A Bestiary Of CD compilation.

History[edit]

The initial idea for Wild Things, and the Creatures, came about during the recording sessions for the Siouxsie and the Banshees album Juju. While bassist Steven Severin and guitarist John McGeoch took a break, Siouxsie and drummer Budgie created the song "But Not Them." Deciding that it was complete as a drum-and-voice piece, they left it alone, and quickly recorded four more minimal tracks to accompany it. The result was the Wild Things EP (so named by Severin, who upon hearing it, said it sounded like something the creatures in the book Where the Wild Things Are would have danced to on their island). The only cover version on the EP was the Troggs' "Wild Thing"; Siouxsie added extra angry lyrics to the original "Wild thing, I think I hate you/but I wanna know for sure/so come on, hit me hard/I hate you".[2] "So Unreal" drew inspiration from the novel The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin, and "Mad Eyed Screamer" from local characters met in Hyde Park, London. The duo incorporated the songs "But Not Them", "So Unreal" and "Thumb" into Banshees concerts for many years afterwards.

The erotic sleeve art featuring Siouxsie and Budgie half-naked under a shower was inspired by the pictures of Man Ray; the artwork caused some controversy. Another shoot, inspired by the John Millais painting Ophelia, featured the singer naked under many flowers and shallow water.

Legacy[edit]

Singer Kate Jackson of the Long Blondes rated "So Unreal" as one of her favourite tracks, saying: "Siouxsie [has got] sharp lyrics and staccato vocals. Budgie is one of the most interesting drummers in the world. He uses drum sounds melodically as well as rhythmically which makes this drum/vocal duo work. You can hear their passion for each other in these recordings, they are so alive, despite being so minimal".[3]

David Cheal of the Financial Times wrote about the Creatures' rendition of "Wild Thing": "Perhaps the most striking of those 7,500-odd licensed recordings [of "Wild Thing"] is [the Creatures version] on which Siouxsie’s chilly multitracked vocals (at one point she chants, "Wild thing, I think I hate you") are accompanied only by Budgie's tribal-sounding drums. It’s a version that taps into the earthy, elemental spirit of the song, channelling those few minutes back in 1964 when Chip Taylor lost himself in the darkness of a New York studio".[4]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written and composed by Siouxsie and Budgie, except track 4 composed by Chip Taylor.

  1. "Mad Eyed Screamer"
  2. "So Unreal"
  3. "But Not Them"
  4. "Wild Thing"
  5. "Thumb"

Sources[edit]

  • The Creatures Biography Thecreatures.com. Biography written by drummer Budgie, April 2000.
  • Paytress, Mark. Siouxsie & the Banshees: The Authorised Biography. Sanctuary, 2003. ISBN 1-86074-375-7

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wild Things Creatures Uk Charts". Officialcharts.com. Retrieved 8-5-2012
  2. ^ Vincent, Alice (5 February 2013), Wild Thing: The story behind the song, Telegraph.co.uk, retrieved 15 August 2015
  3. ^ "Kate Jackson the Long Blondes playlist". Theguardian.com. 21 July 2016. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  4. ^ Cheal, David (14 August 2017). "Wild Thing': the elemental riff that cemented the Hendrix legend". Financial Times. Retrieved 14 August 2017.