William de Cantilupe (died 1254)

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Arms of William III de Cantilupe: Gules, three fleurs-de-lys or ("Cantilupe Ancient"). These arms are blazoned in Glover's roll of arms[1][non-primary source needed] and are as depicted by Matthew Paris (d.1259) in his Historia Anglorum,[2] see below

William III de Cantilupe (died 25 September 1254) (anciently Cantelow, Cantelou, Canteloupe, Latinised to de Cantilupo) was the 3rd feudal baron of Eaton Bray in Bedfordshire,[3] and jure uxoris (in right of his wife Eva de Braose, heiress of the de Braose dynasty of Welsh Marcher Lords) was feudal baron of Totnes in Devon[4] and Lord of Abergavenny. His chief residences were at Calne in Wiltshire and Aston Cantlow (named after his family), in Warwickshire, until he inherited Abergavenny Castle and the other estates of that lordship.

Origins[edit]

He was the eldest son and heir of William II de Cantilupe (d.1251) by his wife Millicent de Gournay (d.1260), a daughter of Hugh de Gournay and widow of Amaury VI of Montfort-Évreux (d. 1213), Earl of Gloucester. His uncle was Walter de Cantilupe (1195-1266), Bishop of Hereford and his younger brother was Thomas de Cantilupe (1220-1282), Bishop of Hereford and Chancellor of England, canonised in 1320.

Marriage and progeny[edit]

Arms of William V de Braose (d.1230), as drawn by Matthew Paris (c.1200-1259) in his Historia Anglorum (folio 116): Party per pale indented gules and azure[5]
Effigy in the Priory Church of St Mary, Abergavenny believed to represent Eva de Braose (d.1255), wife of William III de Cantilupe. She is covered by a large shield sculpted with the arms of Cantilupe ancient (three fleurs-de-lys) and holds a heart in her two hands[6] This is not as might seem reasonable to assume from the armorials, the effigy of her daughter Joan de Cantilupe (d.1271), the heiress of the Lordship of Abergavenny, who (according to Monastic Wales: New Approaches edited by Janet Burton, Karen Stöber[10] (Dugdale, Antiquities of Warwickshire, Vol.1, p.183, quoted by DNB)) was buried in the Franciscan Friary at Coventry (w:Greyfriars, Coventry), Warwickshire, together with her husband Henry de Hastings (d.1269) and her son John de Hastings, 1st baron Hastings (d.1313), Lord of Abergavenny. However Joan de Cantilupe's heart was buried in Abergavenny Priory, and "her effigy there shows her holding a heart in the palm of her hand". (Burton & Stöber) This effigy with the Cantilupe shield is also holding a heart, but with both hands (see better image[11])

At some time before 15 February 1248 he married his father's ward Eva de Braose (d.1255), a daughter and co-heiress of William V de Braose (d.1230), "Black William", Lord of Abergavenny, by his wife Eva Marshal, daughter and eventual heiress of William Marshall, 1st Earl of Pembroke. Eva's wardship and marriage had been purchased by his father in 1238. Eva is said to be represented by the surviving recumbent female effigy in the Priory Church of St Mary, Abergavenny (formerly the church of Abergavenny Priory), most of whose body is covered by a large shield sculpted with the arms of Cantilupe ancient (three fleurs-de-lys), and holding a heart in her two hands.[7] By Eva he had the following issue:

Death[edit]

Record of the death of William III de Cantilupe made by Matthew Paris (d.1259) in his Historia Anglorum (folio 165v).[21] His shield of arms is depicted in the margin inverted

Cantilupe died in 1254,[11] at about Michaelmas, 29 September. His death is recorded by his contemporary Matthew Paris (d.1259) in his Historia Anglorum thus:

Obiit Will's de Cantelupo; Anno eodem circa festum sancti michaelis obiit Will(ielmus) de Cantelupo juvenis elegans et dives in dolore multorum quia ille tertius iam fuit Cantelupinorum qui infra paucos annos de medio sunt sublati ("W. de Cantilupe died; In the same year (i.e. 1254) around the feast of St Michael died William de Cantilupe, a fine and rich youth, in the grief of many because he was already the third of the Cantilupes who within a few years were lifted up from their midst").

(His father William II had died in 1251 and his grandfather William I in 1239). One of the chief mourners at his funeral was Simon de Montfort, a close friend of the family.[11]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Glover's Roll, part 1, B27, William de Canteloupe
  2. ^ Chronica Maiora - Royal MS 14 C VII, (The Historia Anglorum, or "History of the English", by Matthew Paris (d. 1259), a history of England covering the years 1070-1253. Begun in 1250 and perhaps completed around 1255) arms of William III de Cantilupe, folio 165v[1]
  3. ^ Sanders, I.J. English Baronies: A Study of their Origin and Descent 1086-1327, Oxford, 1960, p. 40
  4. ^ Sanders, I.J. English Baronies: A Study of their Origin and Descent 1086-1327, Oxford, 1960, p. 90
  5. ^ They appear as a marginal drawing of an inverted shield referring to his "impious murder" (Nota impiam murthram). Historia Anglorum, Chronica Majora, Part III; (1250–59) British Library MS Royal 14 C VII f. 116[2] However Matthew Paris depicts different arms for him in his Chronica Majora, Part III, fol.75v, in an inverted shield: Gules, four piles meeting in base or (Lewis, Susanne, The Art of Matthew Paris in the Chronica Majora)
  6. ^ See clearer image[3]
  7. ^ See image[4]
  8. ^ Age of majority for males was 21
  9. ^ Sanders, I.J. English Baronies: A Study of their Origin and Descent 1086-1327, Oxford, 1960, p.40
  10. ^ Sanders, p.40
  11. ^ a b c Stacey 2004
  12. ^ Sanders, p.40
  13. ^ Sanders, p.23
  14. ^ Kingsford 2004
  15. ^ Dugdale, William (1605-1686), Antiquities of Warwickshire, 1656, p.616, re manor of Aston Cantlow[5]; M Julian-Jones, Thesis on de Cantilupe and Corbet families, 2015, Online Research @Cardiff (ORCA), Cardiff University, p.83[6]
  16. ^ Dugdale
  17. ^ Dugdale, William, Antiquities of Warwickshire, 1666 edition, p.115[7]
  18. ^ according to Monastic Wales: New Approaches edited by Janet Burton, Karen Stöber[8]
  19. ^ see better image[9]
  20. ^ GEC Complete Peerage, vol.VI, p.384
  21. ^ http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=royal_ms_14_c_vii_f001v

References[edit]

  • Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem. III. London: HMSO. 1912.
  • Kingsford, C.L. (2004). "Hastings, Sir Henry (1235?–1269)". In Ridgeway (ed.). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 26 November 2012.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  • Stacey, Robert C. (2004). "Cantilupe, William (III) de (d. 1254)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 28 November 2012.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)

Further reading[edit]

  • Sir Bernard Burke C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms (compiler). (1996). A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire. Baltimore:: Genealogical Publishing Co, pg. 101.
  • Cokayne, G. E. (1912), Gibbs, V. (ed.), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, II (new, 13 volumes in 14 (1910–1959) ed.), London: The St. Catherine Press Ltd.
  • Frederick Lewis Weis (with additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris). (1992). Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, Line 66.29. Lines: 39-29, 39A-29, 93A-28, 232A-32