William L. Alden

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from William Livingston Alden)
Jump to: navigation, search
William Livingston Alden
Born (1837-10-09)October 9, 1837[1]
Williamstown, Massachusetts
Died January 14, 1908(1908-01-14) (aged 70)[1]
Parent(s) Joseph Alden

William Livingston Alden (1837–1908) was a prominent American journalist, fiction writer, humorist, canoe enthusiast. He was a US diplomat in Rome from 1885 to 1890 and thereafter lived in Europe until shortly before his death.

Biography[edit]

William Livingston Alden was born in Williamstown, Massachusetts on October 9, 1837. He attended Lafayette College and transferred to Jefferson College after his father, Joseph Alden, was elected president.[2]

He graduated from Jefferson in 1858 and read law in New York City with William M. Evarts, joining the bar in 1860.[3] He practiced law until 1866.[3][4] He then became a journalist, writing for the Scribner's Monthly, The Atlantic, New York World and Daily Graphic.[1][3] He later worked on the editorial staff of The New York Times and produced a weekly column called "Minor Topics".[5] He also wrote humor pieces and juvenile fiction.[6] While in New York City he became an early member of the Theosophical Society, an esoteric organization founded by Helena Blavatsky in 1875.[7]

Alden is also credited with bringing the sport of canoeing to the United States.[6][8] He founded the New York Canoe Club in 1871, which was the first canoeing organization in America.[9] He was a founding member of the American Canoe Association and served as its first Commodore.[6][10]

Alden was appointed Consul General in Rome, Italy, by President Grover Cleveland in 1885, a position he held until 1890.[6] He then lived in Paris, writing for the New York Herald, and later living and writing in London.[1] He died in 1908.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Riley, Sam G. (1995). "Alden, William Livingston". Biographical dictionary of American newspaper columnists. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 6. 
  2. ^ "Jefferson College 1802–1865". U. Grant Miller Library Digital Archives. Washington & Jefferson College. Archived from the original on 2009-05-01. 
  3. ^ a b c Jennings Coffin, Selden; William Baxter Owen. "William Livingston Alden, A.M.". Record of the men of Lafayette: Brief biographical sketches of the alumni of Lafayette College from its organization to the present time. Lafayette College. p. 210. 
  4. ^ Biographical and Historical Catalogue of Washington and Jefferson College. Elm Street Printing Company. 1889. p. 211. 
  5. ^ The column was renamed "Topics of the Times" in 1896 with Frederick Craig Mortimer as the author until 1926, when it was taken over by Simeon Strunsky until 1946.
  6. ^ a b c d e "THE LIFEWORK OF WILLIAM L. ALDEN: Highly Esteemed Both Sides the Atlantic for His Clever Writings. FAMOUS AS A HUMORIST: Consul General at Rome Under Cleveland – First Commodore of American Canoe Association.". The New York Times. January 16, 1908. Retrieved 2016-11-10. 
  7. ^ Gary Lachman (2012). Madame Blavatsky: The Mother of Modern Spirituality. New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin. p. 136. 
  8. ^ "The Cruising Canoe and its Outfit". Harper's New Monthly Magazine. Harper & Brothers. August 1880.  That is an undated reprint by the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association, Ltd (wcha.org).
  9. ^ Hoffman, Ronald C. (June 1967). "The Formation and Growth of the American Canoe Association" (PDF). Ph.D. Dissertation. American Canoe Association. 
  10. ^ "Commodores / Presidents". American Canoe Association. 2008. [dead link]

External links[edit]